Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Susan Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide
topic

Inflammation

Checking Your Dog for Anal Gland Cancer

Unseen Does Not Mean Undetectable It’s great to develop a habit of performing regular check-ups of our dog’s body by physically running our hands down their legs, looking in their ears, and sneaking in some extra neck rubs while we feel for lumps and bumps. Some dangers however, develop internally. Knowing how to detect these…

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Lumps or Bumps Around Your Dogs Eyes or Ears? Here’s How to Check

Keep an Eye on It Most dogs aren’t comfortable with direct eye contact. That’s just their nature. So if my boy has a weepy eye or I suspect there may be a problem, of course he will hesitate to let me have a good look. He may also not want my vet to peer even…

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Metronomic Chemotherapy for Dogs with Cancer

What is Metronomic Chemotherapy? Metronomic chemotherapy is a relatively new type of chemotherapy that uses low doses of oral (pulse) chemotherapy given on a continuous treatment schedule. Since it is given daily or every other day, the chemotherapy is given at lower doses then typical chemotherapy, often with a reduced toxicity profile. That reduction in…

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Diet and Dogs with Cancer

Dr. Ettinger’s views on diet have changed since she co-authored The Dog Cancer Survival Guide and attended the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Associations’ conference. This is important stuff!

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Common Cancer Mistake: Starting Your Dog with Lymphoma on Prednisone Too Soon

It happens all the time, so don’t beat yourself up if you’ve done it. But if you can, avoid the use of steroids (such as prednisone) before chemotherapy, or before the diagnosis of lymphoma is confirmed. Now, I’m not bashing prednisone across the board. Steroids are used for many things in veterinary medicine. For example,…

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DogCancer.TV: Mast Cell Tumors- What You Need to Know About Your Dog’s Cancer

Dr. Ettinger and Dr. Dressler talk about the detection, diagnosis, and the Full Spectrum Care Approach to treatment of mast cell tumors in dogs.

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DogCancer.TV: Transitional Cell Carcinoma- What You Need to Know About Your Dog’s Cancer

Dr. Dressler and Dr. Ettinger discuss the detection, diagnosis, and Full Spectrum Care Approach to treatment of transitional cell carcinoma in dogs.

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DogCancer.TV: Help for Your Dog’s Nausea

In this video, Dr. Ettinger and Dr. Dressler discuss nausea as a side effect of dog cancer, in addition to some methods and treatments to help deal with nausea.

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Osteosarcoma: when amputation is not an option

In my most recent blog, we discussed amputation for limb osteosarcoma (OSA), the most common local treatment for the primary tumor in the bone. We discussed that amputation is not an easy decision for pet Guardians, even though most older dogs with average, moderate arthritis usually do well on three legs. If my clients are…

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Why Is Diet Ignored In Dog Cancer Care?

Why on earth is diet ignored in dog cancer? This is a huge blind spot in the veterinary profession. We should start looking at this.

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The Oncologist’s thoughts on mast cell tumors

If ever there was a tumor that fits the saying: “one size does NOT fit all”, it is mast cell tumors (MCT). These tumors are common, particularly skin tumors, in dogs. You may know a dog that had a mast cell tumor removed with surgery and went on to live many happy years to never…

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Brussels Sprouts, Broccoli and Cabbage in Dog Cancer Diet?

Here is a link to a page on the store where you can get a free download of the Dog Cancer Diet eBook, which is excerpted from my full-length book, The Dog Cancer Survival Guide.  You are invited to get this information-packed bundle of everything you need to know for your dog’s diet when dealing…

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Diagnosing mast cell tumors

When should you see an oncologist for a mast cell tumor (MCT)? I recommend you get an oncologist involved early. But before you see me, you need to know what a MCT looks like, and how they are diagnosed. Most dogs are not feeling or acting sick when they are diagnosed with MCT. Usually the…

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My Experience with CyberKnife RadioSurgery

In my last post, I introduced CyberKnife RadioSurgery, a type of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This is the radiation unit we have at my specialty hospital, the Animal Specialty Center in Yonkers NY. I want to tell you a little bit more about my own experience with this new technology, but first, a quick recap on…

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Could Killing “Good” Bacteria Increase GI Cancer Risk?

Could destroying the normal bacteria in your dog’s body be a risk factor for cancer down the road? This may sound very far-fetched.  However, in the spirit of avoiding condemnation before investigation, read on! It turns out that the so-called “healthy” bacteria in the body may provide cancer protection.  And therefore, if this bacteria is…

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Ginseng, a common Chinese herb, For Dog Cancer

Ginsing is a common herb used in eastern medicine, and is now being used for dogs by practitioners of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine. There is good reason for this.  Ginseng has some very definite effects that are real, and may help a dog with cancer.  I’d be thinking mainly of using ginseng for mammary cancers…

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What’s new with oral malignant melanoma?

I was not planning on my next blog to be about oral malignant melanoma (or OMM) in dogs, but I just attended a really great meeting on the topic in New York City. It cut  into my weekend family time, so I am happy that the meeting was so informative. This meeting was VECOG, or…

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Bioflavonoid Quercetin has Anti-Cancer Effects

Quercetin has been around for some time as it is a naturally occurring compound found in the peels of citrus, capers, certain herbs, onions, and grapes**. Quercetin is also found in the Chinese Scholar tree, one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Quercetin has some interesting and fairly potent anti cancer…

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Dog Cancer Pain Control

Pain is a very important part of dog cancer, since it is one of the main life quality negatives for a canine cancer patient. However, not many guardians are aware of all of the tools in a veterinarian’s toolbox to help with pain.  In this post, we will look at both common and uncommon ways…

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Can a Dog Cancer Diagnosis Be Wrong?

The news that a loved dog has cancer turns the world upside-down. Shock, dismay, disorientation, anger, and profound feelings of loss or sadness are common.  Another common response is questioning the diagnosis. “My dog seems fine.  The lump does not seem to bother her.  His appetite is good.  She still plays.  How can he have…

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CCNU Use for Lympho Rescue Protocols

Chemotherapy in dogs is used differently than in people.  In people, there are protocols that might in some cases eliminate the cancer for many years. In dogs though, the cancer usually comes back, many times in months. (For this reason, we use a wide variety of treatments above and beyond chemotherapy in the Guide). However,…

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Surgery and “Blood Thinning” Drugs and Supplements

The approach in The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, as well as my own personal philosophy concerning problem-solving, is to use what works, regardless of the packaging material. In other words, it makes no difference if the recommendation comes from a conventional (allopathic) vet, or an “alternative” vet, as long as it works, is safe and…

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Signs of Brain Cancer In Dogs

Tumors in the brain are very tough for us in veterinary medicine today. There are two reasons for this.  One is that they are hard to diagnose without advanced imaging like CT or MRI.  These are not available to everyone, since many do not live within a reasonable distance, and they are not cheap. The…

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The Inflammatory Diet and Cancer

It turns out that modern changes in our dog’s diets may have a link to cancer development. It is now known that cancer needs inflammation to start, and to get worse.  Inflammation is the process where body parts get red, swollen and painful.  If we get an injury, inflammation happens as the first step in…

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Metronomic Chemotherapy

Traditional chemotherapy is moving in a new direction. In the past, chemotherapy used a strategy called Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD).  Simply put, this is giving the highest dose a patient can handle, ideally without an unacceptable risk of side effects. The reason this strategy is used in cancer medicine is that the drugs we have…

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Life Quality: Is My Dog In Pain?

Physical comfort is very important for a dog’s life quality.  When it comes to canine cancer, life quality is a central topic that deserves much attention. Since the systemic cancers are so formidable and resist successful treatment, often increasing life span and maintaining a normal life quality are main goals. Life quality can be evaluated…

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New Approaches to Squamous Cell Cancer

A cancer we see in from time to time veterinary hospitals is called squamous cell carcinoma. Even though it is not as common as other cancers in dogs, for any dog lover coping with this diagnosis, it is a huge issue. These cancers are not fun. First of all, especially in advanced cases, they are…

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Dog Prostate Cancer: Intraoperative Radiation

Prostate cancer in the dog is very different from that in people.  Not because the cancers themselves are that different, but because treatment success is different. This has not been good news for our dogs.  The success rates (due to surgical techniques, mainly) for dealing with human prostate cancer are much better than for dogs.…

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Real-Life Stem Cell Therapy

The last post focused on the newest version  of a canine “Bone Marrow Transplant.” In a nutshell, this is a brand-new procedure that may produce a good number of actual dog cancer cures. Curing canine cancer essentially unheard of in conventional veterinary care using chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, at least with the systemic dog cancers.…

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Hit The Bull’s Eye With Dog Cancer Drugs

One of the problems with chemotherapy, in addition to cost and trips in and out of the hospital is toxicity.  It can be especially difficult to handle a toxic event when the whole point of chemo in treating dog cancer is palliation. Palliation is defined as a reduction in the signs or symptoms of a…

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