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Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Sue Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide

Full Spectrum Cancer Care

If you're facing dog cancer and you feel overwhelmed, there's a good reason for that: it's overwhelming. There is a lot of information to sort through and understand, and it's not always easy to get it from veterinarians. Full Spectrum Cancer Care is an approach pioneered by Dr. Demian Dressler, author of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, that includes conventional approaches like surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, but also many other strategies from other medical traditions that have been shown to have value for dogs with cancer.

The following articles were written by The Dog Cancer Vet Team to introduce you to some of the most important aspects of his method of understanding and treating dog cancer. We hope you find them helpful.

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Using the Full Spectrum Approach: Alternative and Complementary Therapies for Dogs with Cancer

When my dog was first diagnosed with cancer I spent time every day looking for help for him.  It’s what we do.  My vet was wonderful, and together we worked out a great conventional treatment plan.  But I wanted more. I wanted everything that had any chance of helping. Sound familiar? In addition to terrific…

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Better Life Quality: Play with Your Dog with Cancer

How important is it to play with your dog with cancer? Very!

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Metronomic Chemotherapy for Dogs with Cancer

What is Metronomic Chemotherapy? Metronomic chemotherapy is a relatively new type of chemotherapy that uses low doses of oral (pulse) chemotherapy given on a continuous treatment schedule. Since it is given daily or every other day, the chemotherapy is given at lower doses then typical chemotherapy, often with a reduced toxicity profile. That reduction in…

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Diet and Dogs with Cancer

Dr. Ettinger’s views on diet have changed since she co-authored The Dog Cancer Survival Guide and attended the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Associations’ conference. This is important stuff!

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Facing Dog Cancer? This Is Your First Priority

When we first read The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, we were astonished to find out what our number one priority should be when it comes to helping our dogs with cancer. According to author Dr. Demian Dressler, our priority has nothing to do with our dog’s illness. “Right out of veterinary school, I would have…

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Is Your Dog’s Food Helping or Hurting?

One of the most important things you can do for your dog with cancer is improving his or her diet, which is why Dr. Demian Dressler, author of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, made food the exclusive focus of step four of his five step approach to cancer care. But how far do you have…

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Do You Need an Oncologist on Your Dog Cancer Team?

Do you really need an oncologist on your dog cancer team? Sigh. As always with dog cancer, the answer is not the same for everyone. Dead Set Against Conventional Treatments? No Need. If you already know that you would never, ever, ever use surgery, chemotherapy or radiation to treat your dog’s cancer, hiring a specialist…

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“Alternative” Strategies That May Help Dogs with Cancer

Some conventional vets find Chapter Fifteen in The Dog Cancer Survival Guide one of the most controversial sections of the book. It’s where Dr. Demian Dressler talks about his fifth step in Full Spectrum cancer care: brain chemistry modification. Dr. Dressler has found that it’s really important to boost your dog’s mood in order to…

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Winter Dangers for Dogs with Cancer

It’s Always Something Even as I begin writing this post I sigh at the title “Winter Dangers”.  It just seems that everywhere we turn there is a threat! And constantly being on guard can be exhausting! So I offer this to you both from the perspective of caring for your dog with cancer, who may…

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Checking your Dog for Testicular Cancer

One for the Boys Intact males (those who have not been neutered) may, in later years be more prone to bladder, prostate or testicular cancer.  Dr. Ettinger’s post “Spay/neuter and the association with cancer in dogs: part one” discusses the pros and cons of neutering in more detail, and is a wonderful read. When my…

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Is my dog too old for cancer treatments? Face of black dog.

Is My Dog Too Old For Cancer Treatments?

Age is not a disease, but when your dog is diagnosed with cancer, it can be confusing to know if your dog too old for cancer treatments. Dr. Dressler explains…

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How Old Is Too Old to Treat Dog Cancer?

I hear this question a lot: “Isn’t my dog too old to treat for cancer?” The answer is: No! Age is not a disease. I have many 12-plus year old patients that are otherwise healthy and strong. They may have some early kidney disease, a heart murmur, thyroid disease, arthritis, but they are still good…

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Holiday foods and dog cancer. Dog licking lips looking at cooked turkey.

Holiday Foods and Dog Cancer

We all want our dogs to join in the holiday fun. Here are some safety tips to keep in mind.

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Should My Regular Veterinarian Give My Dog Chemotherapy?

Here’s a touchy subject for us to look at: why can’t my regular veterinarian give my dog chemotherapy? Do I really need to see a specialist? I am often asked these questions by clients, and my answer is always the same:  no. That might sound harsh, but let’s look at this a little closer. If…

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Common Cancer Mistake: Assuming Chemotherapy Is Not an Option

Do dogs suffer during chemotherapy for their cancer treatments? This veterinary oncologist has an answer that might surprise you.

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Dog Cancer Mistake - Paying for Tests You Don't Need

Common Dog Cancer Mistake: Doing Too Many Diagnostic Tests Before Seeing the Oncologist

When you first hear your dog has cancer, you may panic and feel that everything must be done, and now. It’s true, cancer is an urgent situation, and it’s a great idea to find out as much information about your dog’s cancer as is possible. But how many diagnostic tests should you have your vet…

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Five common mistakes with cancer surgery. Dog in bed with bandage on head.

Five Common Mistakes with Cancer Surgery, and How To Avoid Them In Your Dog

These are the five most common mistakes with cancer surgery. Read on to find out how to save both time and money (yes, really).

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What Is Full Spectrum Cancer Care?

How does Full Spectrum Cancer Care differ from conventional, holistic, or alternative care? It drops the bias and embraces tools from any system of medicine that have been shown to help fight cancer.

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Primary Lung Tumors, part 2

Unlike people where lung cancer is one of the top five cancers and the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide, primary lung cancer is very rare in dogs. Dogs are often diagnosed with lung cancer as in incidental finding during a routine geriatric screen. Lung Cancer Symptoms in Dogs Often dogs have NO clinical signs,…

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Uncommon Tumors: Primary Lung Tumors, Part 1

As a boarded oncologist, I see not only the common cancers in dogs like lymphoma, mast cell tumors, osteosarcomas, hemangiosarcomas, and mammary cancers. But I also see the uncommon ones. Recently I have been seeing more of the uncommon tumors, and what’s even strange to me, I am seeing more that one within a few…

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