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Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Susan Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide
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Diagnosis

Cancer Cure?

Recently I heard the comment that medicine (in my case, veterinary medicine) is primitive. This is a very interesting comment, especially if we are talking about canine cancer. When you are coping with a canine cancer diagnosis, the question of curing cancer comes up frequently.  Now, shifting back to this idea about medicine being primitive,…

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Help! Found A Lump On The Dog… Now What?

Dr. Demian Dressler, best-selling author of “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide”, explains exactly what to do when you find a lump on your dog.

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Using Dog Cancer Statistics

The one of the first steps in the plan for helping you with dog cancer in The Guide is data collection.  Without data about your dog’s cancer, survival times, life quality during treatment, side effects, costs, nursing care you will be expected to do, your dog’s normal life expectancy and so on, you will be…

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Treatment Plan Analysis in Real Life

Yesterday, a 13 year old Rottweiler came in to the hospital. She had been limping, and there was a swelling in her front leg, down on the forearm.  It was firm and slightly warm to the touch.  The area was about 4 inches long. We took X-rays of the sore leg.  The films showed a…

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Diagnosis of Nasal Tumors

Tumors of the nose and sinus in dogs are often difficult to diagnose at first. These tumors are located inside the nasal passages, invisible to the naked eye, at least in the earlier stages. Many times a guardian will notice that their four legged family member starts to sneeze more often.  The first thought can…

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A Newer Option for Dogs with Vomiting

When a four legged family member is feeling sick it is heart breaking. When they are vomiting, it can be horrible for everyone involved. Vomiting is not rare in canine cancer patients. Often, the cancer itself can cause our friends to feel nausea and throw up. Sometimes conventional care treatments like chemotherapy, surgery, medication reactions,…

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Dog Cancer Tests: Blood, Urine and More?

Healthy dogs should have early detection cancer screens.  The reason for this is that veterinarians often fail to eradicate cancer in a given dog.  The fact that cancer is the single number one cause of dog death should make this clear. If you have a dog of about 10 years of age or more, statistics…

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Signs of Dog Cancer and Decompensation

People are often stunned to find out their dog has cancer. Why? Because cancer seems to hit out of the blue. I often hear “but he’s been fine until the last couple days!” In this article, I’m going to take just a minute to explain why “cancer” seems to happen overnight. (Hint: it’s because of…

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Is There Hope For Dog Cancer?

Hope. Even looking at the word on a computer screen can cause an odd mix of feelings.  This is especially true if you are coping with a canine cancer diagnosis. If there was ever a double-edged sword, hope is it.  On one hand, allowing yourself to feel hope can turbocharge your abilities and motivation. On…

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A Change in Viewing Dog Cancer

I gave a webinar this morning that focused on making a dog cancer treatment plan.  I realized the topic should be presented, as so many blog readers post specific questions, but many are essentially the same query. So I presented a structure that would allow people to answer their own version of the question, with…

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Survival Times and Dog Cancer

I recently got a comment from a reader who was quite upset with her veterinarian. Turns out her dog underwent a splenectomy (spleen removal), presumably for treatment of a hemangiosarcoma (a malignant tumor of the blood vessel walls)  of the spleen. This dog lover was incensed that the vet  indicated this procedure, combined with removal…

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My Dog is Acting Fine…And Got Diagnosed With Cancer?!?

How is it possible that our loved dogs can be acting fine, without any signs of disease, and have cancer? This is a pretty common scenario, actually.  Many dog lovers have gone to the vet to have a lump checked out.  Then, sometimes even on the same day, the news arrives: cancer. Whether this is…

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Where Do I Begin?

“I am overwhelmed with all the information I am reading to help my dog with cancer.” Does this sound familiar to anyone out there? Most of the readers of this blog are searching for information. Once a true malignancy has developed, the realities can feel utterly unacceptable. This leads to information gathering.  Whenever we are…

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How Did This Happen?

I came across an article today that caught my attention. In Edinburgh, a 9 year old Rottweiler was found abandoned by it’s owner.  He was quite ill, very thin, painful and weak.  This Rott had been tied with a leash and left. As if this were not enough, the dog had end-stage cancer.  The cancer…

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Why Test For Heartworm But Not Cancer?

I was recently thinking about a little problem us veterinary professionals are faced with. We seem to have forgotten about relative risks. A relative risk is simply the risk of something in comparison to something else.  Take the risk of cancer versus the risk of heartworm in a dog on heartworm preventative. Now, I am…

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How Long Does My Dog Have?

It is very important to do what we can to avoid ongoing depression when trying to cope with cancer in our dogs.  Ongoing depression is exhausting, steals our reserves, and clouds judgment. It decreases your dog’s chances of good life quality during a life with cancer.  Yes, your ongoing depression. Please do not misunderstand me. …

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Everything is overwhelming…

Many dog lovers, especially those of you who just received the news that your dog has cancer, feel very overwhelmed.  This is very common and completely natural. So many questions arise.  How did this happen?  Where did the cancer come from? Why wasn’t this picked up before?  Is it the food? Vaccines? Chemicals? What do…

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But my vet has not heard of this….

Dear dog lovers, I have been deluged with comments that some vets out there, maybe even most, have not heard of many of the approaches to dealing with cancer that are beyond surgery, chemo and radiation. As a consequence, there seems to be a large “black box” as to what to do, how to arrive…

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Is it for me or for my dog?

Decision making when loving a dog with a cancer diagnosis can be tough. Many times we will experience some degree of confusion in decision making.  There are many options that are presented.  Should I allow chemotherapy? Amputation?  Is radiation really worth it? I think that a lot of the difficulty may not actually relate to…

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Is The Cause of Cancer Really Not Known?

Conventional vets (and I count myself among this group) suggest that the cause of cancer is not known. Well, this statement rests on a faulty premise, because there is no single cause of cancer.  Cancer is the product of many separate steps that all must occur before the disease happens. So of course the cause…

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Dog Cancer Words You Should Know: Grade and Stage

I think it is important to clear up some words about dog cancer, and cancer in general.  It helps to define what you are talking about with the vet or oncologist so you can get the best info to make your decisions. As your dog’s primary health advocate, you will be called upon to make…

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Dog cancer: What is Micrometastasis and Why Do We Care?

I get a lot of inquiries that relate to whether a cancer is gone after it is removed, or what will be the outcome. Sometimes these are tough to answer, and the reason is micrometastasis. Micrometastsis occurs when a cancer spreads from a site, but the spread is not detectable by the usual means available. …

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Fine needle aspirates to diagnose dog cancer?

Hi everyone, I have been getting questions about the best way to gather info about growths in dogs.  So, let’s take a look at a common technique used to accomplish this…a fine needle aspirate. First of all, a fine needle aspirate is not a biopsy.  A fine needle aspirate is a sample of the mass…

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Biopsy results are in…

The biopsy results are in for the biopsy I performed on my dog Bjorn and it is good news.  

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Biopsy Procedure for Dog Cancer

This video is of the actual biopsy procedure of my dog Bjorn.  It is not too bad to watch.  If you would rather just read, all the information you need is in The Dog Cancer Survival Guide.  

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dog cancer biopsy preparation

This video shows me preparing for a biopsy procedure on my dog Bjorn.  

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