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Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Susan Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide

Vegetables

Updated: November 22nd, 2017

There were many studies, articles and books Dr. Dressler and Dr. Ettinger used when writing The Dog Cancer Survival Guide. Here is a list of the most important references about the use of vegetables.

Please note that in vivo and clinical use citations were included whenever possible. We have also included links to the papers, where available. Most of the papers are found on the National Institute of Health’s online library, PubMed.

Allyl isothiocyanate, a constituent of cruciferous vegetables, inhibits growth of PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in vivo. Srivastava SK, et al. Carcinogenesis. 2003 Oct;24(10):1665-70.

Phytochemicals from cruciferous plants protect against cancer by modulating carcinogen metabolism. Talalay P, Fahey JW. J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3027S-33S. Review.

Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Steinkellner H, et al. Mutat Res. 2001 Sep 1;480-481:285-97.

Human metabolism and excretion of cancer chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of cruciferous vegetables. Shapiro TA, et al. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998 Dec;7(12):1091-100.

Phytochemicals from cruciferous plants protect against cancer by modulating carcinogen metabolism. Talalay P and Fahey JW. J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3027S-33S.

Phytochemicals from cruciferous plants protect against cancer by modulating carcinogen metabolism. Talalay P and Fahey JW. J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3027S-33S.

Evaluation of the effect of dietary vegetable consumption on reducing risk of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder in Scottish Terriers. Raghavan M, et al. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2005 Jul 1;227(1):94-100.

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