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Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Susan Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide
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Full Spectrum Cancer Care

Full Spectrum Cancer Care is the approach taken by the authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide. In Full Spectrum cancer care, we embrace any method that has been shown to help dogs with cancer, regardless of its source.

Luteolin, Apoptosis, and Cancer: New Research That Can Help Your Dog with Cancer

Luteolin is an important and key ingredient in Dr. Dressler’s nutraceutical, Apocaps. One of the main reasons he included this rather exotic (and hard-to-find) dietary apoptogen is because of its ability to stimulate a process called apoptosis, a necessary process of cell death in the body. Apoptosis: Natural Cell Suicide Apoptosis is a means for…

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Supplements for Dogs with Cancer

We once heard Dr. Demian Dressler, veterinarian and author of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, tell “Ask Dr. Dressler” webinar members something very interesting… “Nature has already invented the wheel – it’s just our job to find it.” Dr. Dressler credited Albert Einstein with the original insight. Dr. Einstein once said: “Look deep into nature,…

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Don’t Forget Your Dog at the Veterinarian

When booking a new consultation with me, pet Guardians often ask if it is necessary to bring their dog to the appointment. From their point of view, they are often concerned about the stress of the visit on their pet, or maybe the travel itself. But from my point of view, a consultation without the…

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Guidelines for Dealing with Your Dog’s Chemotherapy Side Effects

As I’ve discussed in other posts, chemotherapy is very well tolerated in dogs. Yes I know that is hard to believe. I have had family members get chemo and we have all seen it on TV, but happily it’s not like that for dogs. Approximately 80% of dogs do not have side effects at all…

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Giving Your Dog Chemotherapy at Home, Safely

  I get a lot of questions about how to be safe around chemo drugs administered at home (for example, during metronomic chemotherapy).  Here are some of the most frequently asked questions, and my answers: Is my pet safe to be around? Yes, your pet is safe to be around after treatment. Being around family…

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Is It OK to Use Leftover Drugs If My Dog Gets Sick?

Should you use those old prescriptions if your dog’s symptoms return? It turns out you probably shouldn’t. Dr. Stacy Branch, our resident pharmacologist, explains why.

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Using the Full Spectrum Approach: Alternative and Complementary Therapies for Dogs with Cancer

When my dog was first diagnosed with cancer I spent time every day looking for help for him.  It’s what we do.  My vet was wonderful, and together we worked out a great conventional treatment plan.  But I wanted more. I wanted everything that had any chance of helping. Sound familiar? In addition to terrific…

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Better Life Quality: Play with Your Dog with Cancer

How important is it to play with your dog with cancer? Very!

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Metronomic Chemotherapy for Dogs with Cancer

What is Metronomic Chemotherapy? Metronomic chemotherapy is a relatively new type of chemotherapy that uses low doses of oral (pulse) chemotherapy given on a continuous treatment schedule. Since it is given daily or every other day, the chemotherapy is given at lower doses then typical chemotherapy, often with a reduced toxicity profile. That reduction in…

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Diet and Dogs with Cancer

Dr. Ettinger’s views on diet have changed since she co-authored The Dog Cancer Survival Guide and attended the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Associations’ conference. This is important stuff!

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Facing Dog Cancer? This Is Your First Priority

When we first read The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, we were astonished to find out what our number one priority should be when it comes to helping our dogs with cancer. According to author Dr. Demian Dressler, our priority has nothing to do with our dog’s illness. “Right out of veterinary school, I would have…

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Is Your Dog’s Food Helping or Hurting?

One of the most important things you can do for your dog with cancer is improving his or her diet, which is why Dr. Demian Dressler, author of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide, made food the exclusive focus of step four of his five step approach to cancer care. But how far do you have…

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Do You Need an Oncologist on Your Dog Cancer Team?

Do you really need an oncologist on your dog cancer team? Sigh. As always with dog cancer, the answer is not the same for everyone. Dead Set Against Conventional Treatments? No Need. If you already know that you would never, ever, ever use surgery, chemotherapy or radiation to treat your dog’s cancer, hiring a specialist…

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“Alternative” Strategies That May Help Dogs with Cancer

Some conventional vets find Chapter Fifteen in The Dog Cancer Survival Guide one of the most controversial sections of the book. It’s where Dr. Demian Dressler talks about his fifth step in Full Spectrum cancer care: brain chemistry modification. Dr. Dressler has found that it’s really important to boost your dog’s mood in order to…

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Winter Dangers for Dogs with Cancer

It’s Always Something Even as I begin writing this post I sigh at the title “Winter Dangers”.  It just seems that everywhere we turn there is a threat! And constantly being on guard can be exhausting! So I offer this to you both from the perspective of caring for your dog with cancer, who may…

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Checking your Dog for Testicular Cancer

One for the Boys Intact males (those who have not been neutered) may, in later years be more prone to bladder, prostate or testicular cancer.  Dr. Ettinger’s post “Spay/neuter and the association with cancer in dogs: part one” discusses the pros and cons of neutering in more detail, and is a wonderful read. When my…

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Dog Too Old For Cancer Treatments

Is My Dog Too Old For Cancer Treatments?

Age is not a disease. When your dog is diagnosed with cancer, it can be confusing to know how old is “too old” for treatment. Dr. Dressler explains…

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How Old Is Too Old to Treat Dog Cancer?

I hear this question a lot: “Isn’t my dog too old to treat for cancer?” The answer is: No! Age is not a disease. I have many 12-plus year old patients that are otherwise healthy and strong. They may have some early kidney disease, a heart murmur, thyroid disease, arthritis, but they are still good…

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Holiday Foods and Dog Cancer

We all want our dogs to join in the holiday fun. Here are some safety tips to keep in mind.

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Should My Regular Veterinarian Give My Dog Chemotherapy?

Here’s a touchy subject for us to look at: why can’t my regular veterinarian give my dog chemotherapy? Do I really need to see a specialist? I am often asked these questions by clients, and my answer is always the same:  no. That might sound harsh, but let’s look at this a little closer. If…

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Common Cancer Mistake: Assuming Chemotherapy Is Not an Option

Do dogs suffer during chemotherapy for their cancer treatments? This veterinary oncologist has an answer that might surprise you.

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Dog Cancer Mistake - Paying for Tests You Don't Need

Common Dog Cancer Mistake: Doing Too Many Diagnostic Tests Before Seeing the Oncologist

When you first hear your dog has cancer, you may panic and feel that everything must be done, and now. It’s true, cancer is an urgent situation, and it’s a great idea to find out as much information about your dog’s cancer as is possible. But how many diagnostic tests should you have your vet…

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Five common mistakes with cancer surgery, and how to avoid them in your dog

Mistake # 1: Watching and Waiting Don’t: Watch the bump or lump. Do: get an aspirate or biopsy. I’ve blogged about this before, but it deserves repeating. No one, not even a boarded oncologist like me, can look at a skin mass, or a mass in the spleen, liver, or lung on imaging, and tell…

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What Is Full Spectrum Cancer Care?

How does Full Spectrum Cancer Care differ from conventional, holistic, or alternative care? It drops the bias and embraces tools from any system of medicine that have been shown to help fight cancer.

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Primary Lung Tumors, part 2

Unlike people where lung cancer is one of the top five cancers and the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide, primary lung cancer is very rare in dogs. Dogs are often diagnosed with lung cancer as in incidental finding during a routine geriatric screen. Lung Cancer Symptoms in Dogs Often dogs have NO clinical signs,…

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Uncommon Tumors: Primary Lung Tumors, Part 1

As a boarded oncologist, I see not only the common cancers in dogs like lymphoma, mast cell tumors, osteosarcomas, hemangiosarcomas, and mammary cancers. But I also see the uncommon ones. Recently I have been seeing more of the uncommon tumors, and what’s even strange to me, I am seeing more that one within a few…

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How to Help Your Dog with Cancer When He Won’t Eat

When your cancer dog won’t eat, it’s really frightening. It makes you think they’re close to the end, right? Don’t panic – try these things to help.

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Spay/neuter and the association with cancer in dogs: part three

“Reproduction is a risky affair.” “Reproduction is a risky affair” is the attention-getting opening line in one of the studies I’ll review today (Hoffman, 2013). But before we go through the new studies, let’s review my previous blogs on this topic. They have been generating some controversy, and with good reason — this is a…

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Heterocyclic Amines in the News

I’m happy to report a news article highlighting one of the subjects, carcinogenic heterocyclic amines, discussed in the Guide. The Mercola article discussed a publication about finding this substance, PhIP, in dog fur (as an aside, not all dogs have fur, as some have hair, but that is a different story!).  PhIP is in a…

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DogCancer.TV: Osteosarcoma – What You Need to Know About Your Dog’s Bone Cancer

Dr. Dressler and Dr. Ettinger discuss the detection, diagnosis, and the Full Spectrum Care Approach to treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs

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