Featuring Demian Dressler, DVM and Susan Ettinger, DVM, Dip. ACVIM (Oncology), authors of The Dog Cancer Survival Guide.
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We are working to make the Dog Cancer News and our blog as helpful as possible.  We would love to hear what you have to say.

Please provide comments, suggestions, criticism (and even compliments) in the comment area below.  We would love to hear what you say and we read all of our comments.

Many thanks.

About the Author: Demian Dressler, DVM


Dr. Demian Dressler, DVM is known as the "dog cancer vet" and is author of Dog Cancer Survival Guide: Full Spectrum Treatments to Optimize Your Dog's Life Quality and Longevity. Visit his blog and sign up free to get the latest information about canine cancer. Go to http://DogCancerBlog.com.

  • http://lifewithtucker.blogspot.com Jessica Slates

    Hi Dr. Dressler,

    I learned of your blog from my friend Rochelle Lesser at Land of Pure Gold. My beautiful Tucker (golden retriever) was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma after having an emergency splenectomy in July. We decided not to do chemo (just too many unknowns for us), and are working with a holistic vet instead. We have Tucker on quite a few supplements and he is doing great thus far. I read about Salmon Oil capsules (http://landofpuregold.com/store/salmon.htm) on Rochelle’s website, and ordered some for Tucker. Our vet doesn’t really seem to know much about them, but I really want to give them to Tucker, based on what I have read about their benefits. Can you recommend a good dose to give him? He weighs about 95 pounds. I would really appreciate any advice you would be willing to provide. I have really enjoyed reading your blog, and have learned so much.

    Thanks!
    Jessica

  • http://justprayonline.com marilynn

    MY DOG WAS DIAG. WITH CANCER, AND SHE STARTED CHEMO ABOUT EIGHT WEEKS, SHE IS SUFFERING FROM DIARRHEA. I WAS WONDERING IF YOU COULD HELP ME. SHE IS VERY UNCOMFORTABLE.
    THANK YOU

  • http://gayla.stone@charter.net Gayla

    Dear Dr. D,

    My Golden died of cancer 2 years ago and I have had a nagging question ever since. She took Rimadyl and Prednisone during her treatment. Here is my question, did the cancer kill my dog or did the medicine I gave her slowly kill her. It has haunted me for 2 years that I may have poisoned her with the drugs I gave her.

  • Loretta Chan

    Hi,
    My 10.5 year old female welsh pemborke corgi was diagnosed with lymphoma 4 months ago and had taken 4 times chemotherapy. The vet suggested her to take Yunzhi & Cordyceps from day one and also started taking K9 Immunity/Transfer Factor and Omega one month later. Lately, I was told by an online pet shop (selling healthy pet food) that recent medical reports said dogs with lymphoma should not take Yunzhi. I couldn’t find those reports and would appreciate if you could comment on that.

  • Kim Gavens

    Hi! Is Milk Thistle (over counter) safe to give dogs?
    Someone told me that she gives it to her dog as preventative liver help…
    My dog is 15 yrs and has Addisons disease, and is on Prednisone, Atarax & takes a Percortin injection once a month for his Addisons..
    Thanks!
    Kim :)

  • Dr. Dressler
  • Dr. Dressler

    Gayla,
    I would be very surprised if the drugs killed your dog. Cancers often kill dogs, while Prednisolone and Rimadyl only rarely kill dogs in the case of unusual reactions.
    Don’t feel bad…this was not your fault. Promise.
    D

  • Dr. Dressler

    Loretta,
    the PSK and PSP, found in coriolus (Yun-Zhi) , is used in Japan for lymphosarcoma in humans. That may answer your question.
    D

  • Dr. Dressler

    Kim, this blog is for dog cancer, but yes, milk thistle is definitely used in dogs.
    D

  • LJ

    My Neo Mastiff was diagnosed with Bone Cancer about 2 months ago. He takes Previcox, adn a special pain pill if he needs it. My other mastiff (his brother) does not have the cancer and seems healthy.
    How can I help him? He is having trouble eating,but not walking yet for teh most part even though he favors his one leg, and I understand he cannot undergo radiation, since it is all through his body. I am basically making him as comfortable as possible for as long as possible. I did not know about the all meat diet, and will change that, but can I give him supplements too?

  • Dr. Dressler

    LJ,
    this thread is for comments to help us improve the blog content, provide suggestions, or give constructive criticism.
    Please post a question on a certain blog post so I can address a specific question to help your dog that everyone can read. There are hundreds of supplements so I need your help in making your question a little more specific.

  • LJ

    OK, then, I have a general question. if you do not recommend grains, isn’t the K9 ingredient I6 – Inositol Hexaphosphate; which is a is a naturally occurring ingredient found in oats, wheat, rice, corn and legumes? How can you say it can be used in 1000mg doses if it is a grain adn you do not recommend grains?

  • Dr. Dressler

    LJ,
    we are interested in restricting carbohydrate intake, not eliminating carbohydrate intake. Specifically, we are interested in glucose limitation or limitations of substances easily metabolized to glucose, of which inositol is not. Finally, 1 gram (1000 mg) daily is roughly 1/30 of an ounce, which is a quite small amount, when you are talking about the weight of what a dog eats in a day. Thus I am not worried about it.

  • http://gayla.stone@charter.net Gayla

    Dr. D,
    Since the death of my golden, I have adopted 2 other dogs. I have been feeding them Natural Choice by Nutro, is that a high quality dog food? My vet suggested that I feed this brand to my dogs. Also, which, if any, are good dog treats on the market? I’ve looked at the ingredients of products in the store and I don’t think I should be giving them to my dogs. Since the death of my dog from cancer, I am confused at what products I should be feeding my new dogs. Can you help, please?

  • Dr. Dressler

    Hi Gayla,
    Due to liability reasons, I cannot say one food is good or bad. What I can say is that you should give a meat based diet (mostly good animal protein, first on the ingredient panel), grass fed is best for the meat…low to moderate fat, low carbs, fresh vegetables (no onions), avoid salt, supplement with omega 3′s, and consider supplementing with berries, brussel sprouts, fresh herbs (parsley, basil, etc), cabbage, kale, mung beans, garlic, ginger, shitake mushroom, digestive enzymes…the veggies should be minced or lightly steamed, and make all changes VERY GRADUALLY OVER 14 DAYS while you monitor for diarrea or vomiting. This is for a dog that does not have cancer, just a healthy, base diet. You can go crazy with supplement selections.
    You should realize about 75% of Golden Retrievers die of cancer, so I doubt it was something you did or did not do.
    Best,
    D

  • Laurel

    Gayla,

    I know you were addressing Dr Dressler, and that this is just a blog comment thread, but since I have fed Nutro Natural Choice in the past I thought my two cents might help. These views do not necessarily reflect the views of the dog cancer blog, I say that so as not to get anyone in trouble.

    The ingredients list may be better than the very cheap foods, but for several reasons I think it is not so great and there are better options.

    1. Nutro is made in the same facilities as most other major brands, Nutro was among the brands involved, although the dry food was not recalled. If you surf the internet a little you will find that people are reporting kidney problems in their pets on Nutro. My mom’s border collie was poisoned to death last year (by Kirkland Signature canned before it was recalled) you do not want to go through that and there is no way to be sure it won’t happen again with the big manufacturers. Shortly before that her cat also kept getting urinary tract stones, on Nutro Indoor Cat, those did not stop until switching to EVO cat food.

    2. My two Labs ate Nutro Natural Choice for the first six years of their lives, then to Kirkland Premium with a similar ingredient list. One had to be put down at age 9 because of metatastic adenocarcinoma. The other developed mast cell cancer at 10 years, which has now a poor prognosis. Before these two our Lab/pointer developed fatal hemangiosarcoma, she was never fed cheap store brands, although she was not always on Nutro. That is three dogs in five years, food is not the only factor, but I can’t help thinking that even big dogs should live longer and healthier than ours have. Many brands have similar ingredients and manufacturing processes to Nutro, so it is an industry-wide problem.

    3. After the poisonings last year we started looking at dog food brands more. Some things I learned to look at are;
    Does the company have its own plant, or does it have some other company manufacture it? Try http://www.thepetfoodlist.com
    What is the nutrient profile of the food, high protein high fat is natural for a dog, grains aren’t.
    What are the actual ingredients, for example some light dog food is full of peanut hulls and cellulose, empty of nutrients and a source of aflotoxins.

    There are a few brands we have fed in the past year, Solid Gold, California Natural and Innova EVO (red meat), we settled on EVO to go grain free, there is no way to know if it would have prevented the cancers, but at least it is something to try. There are others you might want to look at also, go to http://www.petfooddirect.com to easily browse through many brands, most brands have very informative websites of their own too. I would say give EVO a try, it is more expensive but they eat less.

  • Laurel

    Sorry, I didn’t see the latest post, feel free to remove mine if it will cause trouble.

  • http://gayla.stone@charter.net Gayla

    Laurel.

    Thanks for your input into dog food. I think I know what dog food I will be feeding my dogs in the future and it won’t be Nutro. Although we don’t know for sure if food plays a factor in whether or not a pet gets cancer, I can’t help but believe in my heart that it must have an influence, along with other factors.

  • Anonymous

    Dr. Dressler:

    My 7yr old JRT has been diagnosed with cancer. She had it in the summer (June) and the tumor was successfully removed, however less than 5 months later it has returned and is now inoperable.

    Even though I have a wonderful vet who has prolonged the life of many of my animals I am still burning with anger and frustration that I took her to see him on 2nd Oct 08 as I was absolutely sure it was back – but I was sent away with a “She’s fine”

    Last Monday 10th Nov, after surgery to investigate the scan mass, I was told it had invaded the spleen and liver and so was inoperable.

    My vet has a PHD in herbal medicine both Western and Chinese, and has given her a course of dandelion and milk thistle, green tea, and a herb mix which is from his own range – but not recommended any chemo or radiation therapy at all, and has only given her a few weeks to live.

    Obviously I am refusing to accept there is NOTHING to be done at all, and have set about researching as much as possible on canine cancer. Sadly I can’t remember the exact name he gave to her type of cancer, but it’s not Hemangiosarcoma, I’m sure it’s something along the lines of lypo-typo-something-coma)

    I am managing to give her ginger – thanks to your blog – I’ve been doing so for 4 days now, although she is getting sly to it as her appetite is fading, I used to bury it in her steak or chicken – I can now only hide it in butter, but am worried too much fat is bad for her as I have to hide ALL her pills in unsalted butter. I can no longer persuade her to eat broccoli or tomato puree either, but have stepped up the fish oil and have ordered some krill oil.

    I am interested in the melatonin, but I absolutely can’t sleep in the pitch dark and she (especially now) sleeps under my arm all night. I’m wondering if I should make some kind of tent for her to sleep in which will block light – Is it the whole body that needs the dark or just the eyes / head?

    And just to add a ittle on the food discussion – has anyone else heard of Applause? I’m in the UK and found this wonderful tinned food and now have it delivered. Depending on the flavour it comes out looking and smelling exactly like the listed ingredients. If it says chicken and rice and peas, you get chicken rice and peas – that’s it.

    I have no idea how long adorable daily shadow has left, but just wanted to say thankyou for the most sensible, non sensationalist, informative and FREE advice for people who are beside themselves with grief over this terrible disease.

    Helen (and Spanner)

  • Helen Chamberlain

    How long *my* adorable daily shadow has left…

  • Dr. Dressler

    Helen,
    I am sorry to hear this horrible news. Here’s some info:
    1. The eyes are the target for light avoidance. I cannot make recommendations for a specific dog, I supplement my cancer patiens with about 6 mg of melatonin late at night (as close to 2 am as possible) for a 40 pound dog, which is a 18 kg body, roughly 3-4 times the size of a Jack.
    2. Other considerations: read the blog on curcumen (from turmeric)
    3. read about medicinal mushrooms, they
    can help significantly
    4. don’t forget about life quality enrichment/mind-body connection: social stimulation with you, other people, other dogs, physical stimulation to alleviate stress/anxiety/depression (always changing the stimulation via walks, other exercise, location, activity), self esteem building with gentle training and abundant reward, and so on.
    5. Dietary changes are slow…work your way up to the change over 10-14 days by gradually mixing increasing amounts.
    6. Look into luteolin (lutimax)
    7. I cannot predict life expectancy…check out “dog aging” in wikipedia however…and i think you should focus a lot on life quality right now.
    8. It sounds like maybe little Spanner has lymphosarcoma, as a guess.
    9. Check out the Dog Cancer Coping Guide, online.
    Best of luck
    D

  • Helen Chamberlain

    Dr Dressler

    Thank you so much for all the advice and the prompt reply.

    Sadly she stopped eating today so I have been unable to coax anything into her, and after 10 days of trying absolutely everything – and I mean everything – I am beginning to lose all hope.

    I can see her cancer lump on the side of her tummy and it is getting bigger, her tremoring is worse too.

    I will continue as best I can and will research the luteolin.

    Many thanks

    Helen (& Spanner)

  • Karen Howard

    Dr Dressler
    My 8 year old Shepherd/Hound mix boy has just been diagnosed with lymphoma (we are awaiting results to see which type). My natural vet says that the several “annual” vaccines he was given last month by his other vet brought it on (I had brought him in that day for a suspicious lump on his leg, which was malignant and he had a brush with cancer two years before—-had his spleen removed but thankfully did not have hegiosarcoma). So I am beside myself for having hurt him somehow.
    He has just started on the Wiscosin proctocol and is so far doing great….but I want to give him every advantage I can. Is it okay to give him essiac extract, noni juice, reishi mushrooms? I don’t want to do anything that can counteract the chemo. Also, is there anything else we can give him, natural or otherwise?
    THANK YOU FOR THIS SITE!!!
    Karen Howard

  • Demian Dressler

    Karen, sorry to hear this sad news.
    If you lean towards prioritizing the chemotherapy, you run a risk of interference with each one of the items you listed. They each have antioxidants and depending on the doses used, from a theoretical standpoint, this effect may block the pro-oxidant effect of the chemo agents in the Wisconsin protocol.
    However, I am of the opinion that the beneficial effects of some supplements may outweigh the chemo interference. So you need to choose what your priority is: chemo only or a full spectrum approach.
    I hope your vet spoke to you about ND food, which has extended the lives of lympho dogs an additional 6 months.
    There are a lot of supplements discussed in this blog.
    Read about curcumin, EGCG, krill/omega 3 fatty acids, melatonin, carbohydrate restriction to get started.
    D

  • Diane Ellis

    Our 7 year old bichon frise, diagnosed with lymphoma in October, is half way through the Wisconsin Protocol. She’s doing well, although she is experiencing hair loss. My concern is what to do when we reach remission. I have just recently discovered your web site and am hoping for some direction on vaccines, food, medications, etc. Thanks in advance!

    • Dr. Dressler

      Dianne, I am glad your Bichon is doing okay. This is a big question with a lot of information required to really answer, sorry. You should look into the upcoming e-book for some details on this stuff. Discuss with our vet: a cancer diet, only giving absolutely necessary vaccines (consider getting titer tests done), and some of the supplements like curcumin, luteolin and so on.
      Best,
      D

  • Al Brown

    With regard to giving Artemisinin derivatives, do you feel that it is wise to give antioxidant supplements like avemar, Vit. E, Vit. C, etc., on the same day of dosing as the Artemisinin? This appears to be important in light of the fact that ART derivatives bring about a process of oxidative stress where ‘free radicals’ and oxygen species are the important part of why ART derivatives can be successful in bring about apoptosis in cancer cells. What are your views on this? Thank you.

    • Dr. Dressler

      Al, my feeling is that one should give the antioxidants on the 5-7 days while off the art for the reasons you mentioned. I don’t think hours off art is adequate, my opinion only.
      D

  • Darleen

    Dear Cancer Vet,
    I just got work that my 12 year old Welsh Corgi has Leiomyosarcoma of the spleen. He went under emergency surgery the 20 of Dec 2008, and is doing fine today. My vet told me that this cancer is rare and she has only seen one other case of it. She has gotten with the oncologist to find out what are options are. They did a biopsy of the liver and that came back normal thank goodness. Brooklyn did get his spleen removed and the entire mass out. The vet has explained to me that hopefully she got all of it but there is still that chance that there were cells left behind. I have really been doing research on the web and am not finding much and what I am finding is giving me mixed feeling.The Oncologist has told her that chemo was a choice with a life expectancy of 6-8 months or with out it 1-3 months.We have elected not to do the chemo. However he is on medication. Metacam and Cytoxan. He gets 1/2 teaspoon every other day due to his weight.I am terrified of the Chemo drug Cytoxan because of the side effects.My vet feels that he should be ok and we are to bring him back for blood work to check his cell levels in two weeks.

    QUESTIONS:
    Have you had any experience with this cancer at all?
    What can you tell me about it. Since the vet has removed his spleen what is the likely hood of the cancer returning?
    What are the treatment options if any?
    What other supplements can I give him to help him? He is on fish oil right now.

  • D. Baratta

    Hi,

    I was wondering if there are any commercial dog food brands you recommend for dogs with cancer? I’m a little overwhelmed by all the false advertising out there and hard-to comprehend nutrition labels. And though I realize you might not be able to ‘endorse’ anyone…throwing out a few names of trusted brands would really be helpful to me.

    Thanks so much!

    -Di

  • Sharron

    My 11 year old Bichon had a oral mast cell #2 removed 12/1, the reason it was found, she had diarrhea and I took her to check it out, she when on antibotic end of November and again end of December. Her stool never got firm. 4 days ago, it was back with vengence…we are again on antibotics, a bland diet of boiled chicken/white rice. Still no improvement. My question is, could this be cancer related, spread before the tumor was found. I am at my wits end…no one can give me a answer, no it’s not cancer related or yes it is…please help me, what do it need to do next?? Also, started on probomatic (spelling)and a antibotics yesterday…no improvement on all of the above.
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions,

    Sharron Bryant

  • Sharron

    My 11 year old Bichon had a oral mast cell #2 removed 12/1, the reason it was found, she had diarrhea and I took her to check it out, she went on antibotic end of November and again end of December. Her stool never got firm. 4 days ago, it was back with vengence…we are again on antibotics, a bland diet of boiled chicken/white rice. Still no improvement. My question is, could this be cancer related, spread before the tumor was found. I am at my wits end…no one can give me a answer, no it’s not cancer related or yes it is…please help me, what do it need to do next?? Also, started on probomatic (spelling)and a antibotics yesterday…no improvement on all of the above.
    Thanks in advance for any suggestions,

    Sharron Bryant

  • Judi & Abby

    Dr. Dressler,

    I wanted to share with you that my dog’s bladder tumor has begun to shrink and I have ordered Artemisinin from Holly Pharmaceuticals Co. to be given in combination with the Doxycycline, Peroxicam AND of course, Dr. Jones’ Canin Health Supplement. My vet did research and found that the Artemisinin and Dr. Jones’ supplement will work well together. I am thrilled b/c of the fact that I have not yet begun the Arteminisin as I just ordered it. So, is essence, Dr. Jones’ supplement has made an absolute positive difference in my dog’s life as well as all the valuable information found on your website. I am quite anxious to receive and begin the Arteminisinin therapy to see if it shrinks the bladder tumor even more.

    Forever grateful

    Judith and Abigail -

    Grand Rapids, MI

  • renee

    Dr Dressler:

    Thank you for having such a wonderful site. My dog was recently diagnoised with an oral tumor that turned out to be melinoma. It was surgically removed and I recently found out that one of the margins was not clear. My dog and the love of my life, Ben, was a candidate for the cancer vaccinne, and I have been told that I need to either put him through another surgery, and / or 6 rounds of radiation. Ben is a 10 year old Rottie, who has had his spleen, throyid, and parathroyid removed within the last 16 months. He has been through so much so I am a little afraid to put him through so much more. I went to see a holitic vet who had talked about “freezing” the additional cancer cells off and has provided me with alot of herbs and supplements. Have you heard of this procedure working and are suppelments know as stem enhance and IP6 good for my dog or am I causing more harm? I am really at a loss.

    Thank you so much for whatever help you can provide us with. Ben is all I have in this world.
    Renee

  • cynthia lee

    Dear Dr Dressler,

    I have a 13 year old golden, along with his sister. He was diagnosed with stomach cancer 2 years ago Valentine Day, and started on Prednisolone 3-1-07. We reduced it to 5MG every other day since 7-07. He also was diagnosed with immune disease, he could not open mouth all the way, and since has been loosing bone in his head, eyes go in, discharge, etc. I have been cooking for them for the past 2 1/2 years, with diarrhea off and on, and prety chronic since November 2008. He has been in and out of hospital, latest in 1-09, but he pulled thru again. He is called the miracle golden. Last week he stumpled going out the back door, to get the food I was taking out to the patio to feed them. He limped, and then I noticed blood all over the bricks. He pulled out a whole front nail in the front right foot. He was just starting to feel great after the near loss in January, and the diarrhea was getting better as well. I had him at the vet everyday last week, and they removed the soft dressing on Friday. A big soft feeling mass was noticed above the area where the nail had come out. I brought him back Saturday, and was told to biposy it. I got a call late yesterday that it was inconclusive. The are where they did the biopsy today is bleeding, and there is a cyst type are that formed. I am waiting for my vet to call back. I was told the mass should be removed and it will grow back, when, they are not sure. Now they are not even sure what it is. Could this all be a result of the fall and stumble? I have cleaned it and kept it wrapped with neosporin, gauze and ace. I am not sure what to do. He is 13, and his back legs are weak as well. He has great appetite, and is totally there, my wonderful guy. I am beside myself. ( the diarrhea is back the past few days, since this has all gone on) Please, any Help or suggestions?

    Cynthia Lee

  • JOAN

    MY DOG DOES NOT HAVE CANCER YET. HE IS A 7 YR OLD MALE NEUTERED BULL TERRIER WITH ALL HORMONES AT NORMAL LEVELS BUT ESTROGEN LEVELS ARE OVER THE TOP.

    MY VET IS PERPLEXED, HAS RECOMMENDED FLAX W/ LINGANS, THEORY IT WILL BIND TO THE ESTROGEN OR VISA VERSA.

    WHAT ABOUT INDOLE-3-CARBINOL (13C)?

  • JOAN

    CAN INDOLE-3-CARBINOL BE BENEFICIAL TO A MALE BULL TERRIER, 7 YRS., NEUTERED, WITH ESTROGEN DOMINANCE OVER THE TOP? ALL OTHER SEX HORMONES NORMAL. MY VET IS STUMPED. NO SIGN OF CANCER YET, BUT I AM CONCERNED FOR HIS FUTURE.

  • Anonymous

    Dear Cancer Vet,
    I just got work that my 12 year old Welsh Corgi has Leiomyosarcoma of the spleen. He went under emergency surgery the 20 of Dec 2008, and is doing fine today. My vet told me that this cancer is rare and she has only seen one other case of it. She has gotten with the oncologist to find out what are options are. They did a biopsy of the liver and that came back normal thank goodness. Brooklyn did get his spleen removed and the entire mass out. The vet has explained to me that hopefully she got all of it but there is still that chance that there were cells left behind. I have really been doing research on the web and am not finding much and what I am finding is giving me mixed feeling.The Oncologist has told her that chemo was a choice with a life expectancy of 6-8 months or with out it 1-3 months.We have elected not to do the chemo. However he is on medication. Metacam and Cytoxan. He gets 1/2 teaspoon every other day due to his weight.I am terrified of the Chemo drug Cytoxan because of the side effects.He has been in for his recheck on his blood and it looks good. I have to take him again in a couple of weeks now.
    QUESTIONS:
    Have you had any experience with this cancer at all?
    What can you tell me about it. Since the vet has removed his spleen what is the likely hood of the cancer returning?
    What are the treatment options if any?
    What other supplements can I give him to help him? He is on fish oil right now.

  • Darleen

    Dear Cancer Vet,
    I just got work that my 12 year old Welsh Corgi has Leiomyosarcoma of the spleen. He went under emergency surgery the 20 of Dec 2008, and is doing fine today. My vet told me that this cancer is rare and she has only seen one other case of it. She has gotten with the oncologist to find out what are options are. They did a biopsy of the liver and that came back normal thank goodness. Brooklyn did get his spleen removed and the entire mass out. The vet has explained to me that hopefully she got all of it but there is still that chance that there were cells left behind. I have really been doing research on the web and am not finding much and what I am finding is giving me mixed feeling.The Oncologist has told her that chemo was a choice with a life expectancy of 6-8 months or with out it 1-3 months.We have elected not to do the chemo. However he is on medication. Metacam and Cytoxan. He gets 1/2 teaspoon every other day due to his weight.I am terrified of the Chemo drug Cytoxan because of the side effects.He has been in for his recheck on his blood and it looks good. I have to take him again in a couple of weeks now.
    QUESTIONS:
    Have you had any experience with this cancer at all?
    What can you tell me about it. Since the vet has removed his spleen what is the likely hood of the cancer returning?
    What are the treatment options if any?
    What other supplements can I give him to help him? He is on fish oil right now.

    • Dr. Dressler

      Darleen,
      the side effects of cytoxan can be addressed with cordyceps and ginger to start with. You should realize that I cannot give individual dog recommendations here and all should be discussed with your vet.
      Yes, I have seen this cancer.
      I cannot tell the likelyhood of returning cancer, nobody can, I am sorry to say.
      As far as supplements go, I discuss a lot of them here in the blog posts- beta glucans, curcumin, EGCG, luteolin, and more. There is a full-spectrum approach in The Dog Cancer Survival Guide.
      Best of luck
      D

  • Darleen

    Dr. Dressler,
    Thank you so much for responding to my questions.I really appreciate your time.
    Darleen

  • Karen & Harry

    I just read today’s (3/31/09) newsletter, and followed the link to the story about the cancer vaccine used by the U. of Pennsylvania on a dog with lymphoma, now in remission for two years.

    Harry in now in his third week of chemotherapy (Wisconsin Protocol)for lymphoma, eating a mostly-meat diet (some rice with chicken when diarrhea strikes), and taking the Tranfer Factor, Omega 3, and K9 Immunity.

    I’d really like more information on the vaccine than was in the ABC News story. Can you provide more, or at least a name that can start me researching?

    Thanks!

    Karen & Harry, the Dog Of My Dreams…

  • Tabitha Bond

    Hi I hope you can help. My 5 year old golden Ella got a small lump under her chin two weeks ago, we thought was an insect bite and she was given anti-inflammatory which she turned out to be allergic to, her face swelled up so she was given anti histamines, this helped but a couple of days later her jaw swelled up and was very hard the vet thought it could be a blocked salivary gland, the swelling punctured and drained all night, she was then booked in for surgery as the chin was still a hard lump. The surgeon removed the gland I think (looked like a deflated balloon) and a chunk of tissue, this is being checked at the moment, they ex-rayed her chin and are suspicious of the bone, she has scratched that part of her chin since she was a puppy. I will not receive the results for two weeks but to be honest I am hoping you can give me some hope that it doesn’t sound like cancer. She has no symptoms just today she wanted to play with the tennis ball, happy, hungry, playful and as always friendly. I live in Thailand so information is slow. I also don’t know if cancer can just appear like that in a couple of days. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Tabitha

  • babygirlFreida

    Dear Dr. Dressler,

    First of all I’d like to thank you for starting out this really informative & useful website dedicated to our beautiful 4-legged friends.
    Secondly, if you could kindly help us with answering some questions regarding our Freida.

    Our Beautiful 3 Yr old Tibetan Spaniel X, Freida has recently been diagnosed with a MALIGNANT LYMPHOMA with large cell high grade LYMPHOSARCOMA on both eyes.

    We just absolutely shell-shocked to discover our athletic, over-active hazel-eyes could attract such an evil disease like Cancer. She’s only 3 yrs Young.
    I have the Histopathology and Cytology report before me and tried to do as much research on this horrible disease.
    Our Vet has been very helpful with us and very understanding but we’d like to get your opinion.

    It all started with an unusual enlarged third eyelid condition that we thought was “Cherry Eye” from her left eye but after a while in a matter of days just started to grew at a rapid rate and now has spread to her other eye.
    After a closer inspection our vet decided to do a biopsy and the result was heart – breaking.
    We got a blood test, an X-Ray and a Lymp Nodes test done on her and unfortunately the results all came back positive for Cancer (although the X-Ray shows no signs of lumps or masses except for small traces on her neck).
    Today we have just done a Bone marrow test and we’re waiting for the results hopefully tomorrow.
    Our Vet mentioned that this is a rare case of a white blood cell cancer started from the eye and usually are more frequent in OLDER non – cross breeds, and if the result from the Bone Marrow test comes back tomorrow positive unfortunately due to a very slim chance of treatment there is no need to go ahead with Chemo…
    We have been crying our eyes out for the last past couple of days, cannot contemplate how we could possibly live on without our Freida.

    Please Dr. Dressler your professional input will be greatly appreciated.
    *Have you encountered similar problems like these and what would you recommend for us to do?
    *If result is positive for Bone Marrow could she possibly still fight this disease through any other method e.g Holistic, Alternative Medicine?
    *If result is negative what kind of ChemoTherapy is suitable for her?
    *What can we do about her eyes?

    Thank you so much for your time,

    babygirlFreida Mom’n'Pap.

  • Susan

    Dear Dr. Dressler: I recently lost my 8 yr. old male lab to hermangiosarcoma. Three weeks before he was a happy, healthy dog. The tumor was on the inside of his heart. After reading through the comments I had no idea how commom a canine cancer it is. And what did I do that caused it? He was always fed a good food (Innova), received a 1/3 cup of carrots and broccoli chopped up, some supplements. An active dog doing obedience and agility. Also was given Sentnil as a heartworm preventative. My 15 yr. old female lab also is given this and I don’t think I will give it to her anymore. No telling what it could be doing to her. And my new 6 mo. old puppy.

    Your professional input will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you,
    Susan

  • Lori

    Hi Dr.Dressler,
    I have an Italian greyhound and a Borzoi. They both have cancer. The Borzoi has a large tumor the size of a golf ball on near his hock. I have a holistic vet that is treating him with some plant based brown paste that eventually makes the tumor fall off, but very ugly and messy in the process. My italian greyhound has hemangionasarcomas and he is on some sort of herbal formula twice a day. They have both been on a raw diet for the last 5 years. I recently read your article talking about the ecgc without caffeine. In your opiniion how much should each one have. My Borzoi is 75lbs and my IG is 20lbs. Would like to order. Can you please advise.
    Thank you
    Lori

  • http://pepsea.net Carol

    Hi Dr. Dressler

    Do you have any articles on melanoma of the eye? What to use naturally to treat it? My vet at MI State Vet School is really not wanting to do surgery due to the location of the tumor. It is in the iris with major blood vessel running under it. I currently have my Collie on Kumpi Dog food which is suppose to be loaded with antioxidents. Is there anything else I can do to supplement his die. In 6 weeks I have the tumor down a 1/2 mm. However, his condition is still gaurded. We don’t know if it is cancerous or not. They seem to think it is cancer. It is 4mmX 7mm. It was touching the cornea and now it is not. It is 4mmx6.5mm However, the one doctor said it was “differences in how they measured it.” Being a nurse I never heard that. I thought they always measured the widest part of any tumor? Maybe I missed something in oncology rotation. Anyway, what else can I supplement his diet with. Have you had any experience with Kumpi Dog food? I used to have the kibble in a plastic container and when I started reading about the bad stuff in some plastics, I ditched the container and now just have the bag sitting at the feeding station. I hate to have the dog go through a surgery due to the costs involved and the fact he might loose his eye if the blood vessel ruptures. I had three different vets at the eye clinic look at it and all three said the same thing. Wait it out and get him on good nutrition. He was always on good nutrition at my house but the previous owner I don’t think so. Since to dog is not in pain and rubbing it was are going to wait 3 more months and see what happens when we recheck it. I’m open for suggestions on what will work on this type of cancer. Thank you for all your assistance. You can reach me at my email address. I’m glad I found your website and I find it very interesting.

  • alexandra moffat

    Mast Cells: I need information – they are so mysterious. I have a 12++ yr female who had a lipoma, about 4 months ago, erupt, abcess. It was removed. Lab said stage 2 Mast. Since, the long incision line has waxed and waned with many bumps, now very large bumps and angry looking….but not open. I will not operate on her again, nor do chemo. She was on pred but the pUPD got too bad. She is on clariton, tagamet, and benedryl. She feels fine, good appetite, active (considering her age & status), cheerful. She has other lipomas. Have you ever heard of a long time lipoma suddenly errupting like an abcess and resulting in mast tumor? Where else inside her might tumors cause trouble. Short of pred, the vets have nothing to offer. Palladia would be too hard on her. I am not expecting miracles but I would like to understand mast cells better

  • Gayla Stone

    Which anti-imflammatory supplements should I be using on my healthy dogs? How much should I give a 50 lb. dog and a 65 lb dog?

  • Carrie

    My 13 year-old mini dachshund, Schubert, was given 2-4weeks to live in mid-march after being diagnosed with cancer. I wouldn’t settle for that. After doing lots of research and picking a holistic/natural route of treatment, and closely following advice from Dr. Dressler, it is now mid-june and Schubert is acting like a puppy again. Thank you for saving our family.
    -Carrie

    • Dr. Dressler

      Carrie,
      Thank you for those kind words. How great that you are winning!
      D

  • Suzy

    Thank you for this blog Dr. Dressler…My 11 yr. old pug Barney has squamous cell nasal carcinoma. It was diagnosed in Jan. of this year and he has been on limited carbohydrates, supplements, etc. It is spreading rapidly no matter what I do. Any info you have on this type of cancer will be appreciated. I need something topical to keep his nose as dry as possible and that would help with the rawness.
    Thank you.
    suzy

  • http://dogcancerblog.com sandra lovitz

    can my dog use Rimadyl, or his arthritis, and heartworm, flea and
    tick meds. He had surgery a month ago and a peripheal tumor was
    removed from his front left leg near the elbow. It was a low
    grade cancer according to the surgeon… perhaps a forty percent
    chance it would reoccur. Does not invade organs or spread.
    I am afraid to give him the above medications for fear it will
    compromise his immune system. Vet said they were ok… heartworm, flea tick, rimadyl, but I am fearful. Your comments, please.
    Oh, no radiation or chemo treatment.

  • Robert Smith

    Dietary Inorganic phosphates were recently shown to activate the AKT cancer pathway. The study urged those at risk to limit inorganic phosphates in the diet, both for prevention and those in treatment for cancer. Inorganic phosphates like sodium phosphate used in the study, are very very widely used in salt form to preserve foods, baked goods, Subway meats and breads, “fresh” doughnuts, and is injected into chicken, turkey, and fish to increase its shelf life. They poison our dogs as they poison our people food too. Do a google on sodium phosphate AKT for the study or email me for a copy or link.

  • lynn canton

    I have ordered the cancer book, but have not received it yet and would appreciate some help in the meantime. Ripley, my 10yr chocolate standard poodle was diagnosed with a very small mass on his prostrate last nov after his splendectomy. his prognosis was good because the mass was so small, so we did 4 out of 6 rounds of iv chemo last dec/jan(stopped after 4 due to side effects.)Ripley has other chronic diseases such as IBS, gastritious, possible esophagitis, and occaisionlly gets colitis. He has a good life , but is obviously easily stressed. He had gastric torsion when he was 4. His ultrasound in May showed no cancer growth, but last week after noticing him having difficulty peeing and pooping, we discovered the mass had grown. He’s been give piroxicam 8mg. which seems to be helping and has an estimate 3-6 months left. For his numerous other conditions, he is also on sulcrafate 2xday, tylan powder 1/8 tsp. 2x day, cyclosporine 150mg/day, pepcid 20mg.2xday and forti flora. He has been off grains over 1 year and is on venison and sweet potatoe, but has been reluctant to eat that this past week and has been eating some of my other poodles Hills UD(Max is on it for bladder stones). I’m considering the ND for cancer, but am not sure if it’s going to effect his irritable bowel and he’s been allergic to chicken in the past. I just got omega 3-6-9 oil and was wondering how much to give him and any other wholistic meds/suggestions for prolonging his life and reducing any future suffering? thankyou for your help.

  • judy gaetje

    has anyone tried Raspberry Gold for cancer..? my 9 year old golden has hamangiosarcomia ( probably not spelled right) and the lump is on his side…. entwinded in his ribs…. most was taken out with surgery but not all of it. I have tried the light color spray therapy, Frankinsence oils from Young Living, and the tumor is going down. I also have him on the Kangen Water. ( Look this up.. it is amazing. ) Is too much of everything suggested too much???? I wonder if my hamilton will use all that i am giving him in a positive way. how can you tell if anything is working and not moving all over their body? Would an ultrasound of his organs do that???? My heart goes out to everyone on this site……. we all cry together and wish our beloved pups would recover well…… God Speed.

  • martha

    Dear doctor,
    what information can you give on nasal cancer in dogs. “butch will eat but he is getting so thin. I can’t afford chemo nor radiation, what options are left? I don’t want him to suffer, I don’t want him put to sleep, Help!

  • Russell

    Dr. Dressler,
    I recently read your entire book, which has been so helpful that I cannot begin to thank you. Our 7 yr. old rottie was recently diagnosed with osteosarcoma, which has metastasized to the lungs. After amputation, he has begun Carboplatin chemotherapy. We have begun him on a supplementation plan including luteolin, apigenin, k-9 immunity and co-q10, among other things. After reading one of your blogs, along with the book, we were just confused on one point. Are these supplements, which may include antioxidants, interfering with the positive oxidation effects of the Carboplatin on the cancer cells? Thank you so much.

    • Dr. Dressler

      Russell,
      this week’s webinar is on OSA. You might be interested:
      http://www.mydogvet.com
      best,
      Dr D

  • Dr. Dressler

    Dear Russell,
    the doses indicated for the luteolin, apigenin and many of the “Big Guns” are actually pro-oxidant. The anti-oxidant effects of the others when combined with pro-oxidant chemo drugs, from my viewpoint, are outweighed by their other positive effects as far as life quality, toxicity protection, and so on. Good question. Do a google search on antioxidants and dog cancer blog and you will find more information on this topic…
    Best
    Dr D

  • Gary

    Thank you for doing two stories on stem cell transplants. Our Molly was the 5th dog to receive a stem cell transplant at NCSU. Her treatment was excellent and the staff was excellent. Unfortunately, she relapsed in a month after the transplant and she developed 3rd degree heart block. Shortly after she arrived at the cardio clinic to receive a pacemaker, she shocked all of her doctors and passed away. I suspect, as you mentioned in your articles, that radiation and chemo can affect other organs. Molly had had chemo for nearly 13 months and then the blast of radiation for the transplant. She was into her third remission at the time of her transplant.

    Although the previous 58 transplants done by different vets and by NCSU since the late 1990s had not shown heart problems following transplants, I suspect that this will show up in some patients as more patients are done.

    Again, thank you for treating stem cell transplants in your writing and for thoroughly covering this topic.

    • Dr. Dressler

      Gary,
      I am sorry to hear this sad news about Molly. Thank you though for sharing it, as the experience you have may help others.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Debbie

    My dog has been recently diagnosed with melanoma in his nail bed. His toe has been amputated and he starts chemo on Thursday. I’ve been reading your book and with the costs of the chemo I’m trying to decide what in addition I should purchase. There are so many suggestions and I’m trying to find out which is the best for his condition. He is 6 and all other tests have come back great, we caught it relatively early. Any suggestions on which items in Chapter 21 would be best?

    Thanks for any help, Debbie

  • Nick

    I have two dogs currently diagnosed with cancer – osteosarcoma in a Dogue de Bordeaux rescue; GI lymphoma in a PitBull rescue – and was interested in purchasing your book. However, your site DogCancerSurvival.com has been blocked by 2 separate browser due to potential malicious spyware or adware. What gives????

    • Dr. Dressler

      Dear Nick
      I will have customer service and the internet staff look into it immediately. They will be in touch. Thank you for the heads up.
      Dr D

  • Jill

    Hello Dr. Dressler,

    My 6 yr old St. Dane (Bailey) lost his battle with Osteosarcoma yesterday. He was 4 months and one week post amputation. I am sure that the diet suggested in your book helped keep him with us longer and gave him a better quality of life. My question is,since I have a St.Dane puppy (Benson) who was neutered early, and by all that I have read stating that early neutering can possibly lead to Osteosarcoma, is there a diet or supplements that can help prevent this nasty disease in the neutered male dog? In other words is there something I can do to undo the damage done?

  • http://dogcancervet.com Valerie

    Dr. Dressler,

    My three year old shih tzu has had a number of health problems. She has had a re occuring autoimmune deficiency disorder (Anemia). She has had to be hospitalized twice due to the disorder. After the last hospitalization, she started to take Prednisone in order to prevent a relapse. She has now been on the drug for two months, incrementally decreasing dosage. She developed diabetes from taking the drug and is now on insulin as well. The doctor recently put her on the steroid Atopica, that she takes daily. He insists she must remain on the Atopica the rest of her life. The Doctor is very hesitant in weaning her off the Predniose in fear of the disease showing itself once again. He says she very well may relapse, causing finanical distress as well as a lower prognosis of survival. I am not a Doctor, but I myself have not taken a single drug in over five years. I believe in very little Western medicine, I believe in organic food, as well as a holistic and homeopathic way to treating the body and its’ ailments that can occur. I am very weary (and quite frankly uneasy) about keeping her on these drugs much longer (let alone the rest of her life). An expert opinion from yourself on the situation would be much appreciated.

    Thank you so much and God Bless,

    Valerie.

    • Dr. Dressler

      Dear Valerie,
      I will address your concern, but in the future please reserve your questions to those regarding dog cancer as this is devoted to that, not immune mediated diseases. Here is the short and direct information:
      1. Get a second opinion
      2. Atopica is not a steriod but is an immune suppressing drug
      3. Many dogs can be maintained on atopica alone, without the use of pred. This would minimize the diabetic insulin requirement.
      4. Immune mediated disease like this is dangerous, so be cautious of letting go of therapeutic control (going off drugs). Don’t convince yourself otherwise without very careful and frequent blood testing to maintain control.
      5. You can use less atopica if it is combined with ketoconazole and/or grapefruit extract (naringen and naringenan) to lessen expense
      Hope that helps you,
      Best
      Dr D

  • Dave

    Dr. Dressler,

    As stated under your article regarding Mirtazapine, my dog has cancer (Lymphoma). Would you mind reading this? This looks like the most promising lymphona cure I’ve seen since researching it starting almost one year ago:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091122161753.htm

    I am going to try to get ahold of the doctor and see if I can get some of this drug. I’m not sure if he’ll talk to an average person. Would you mind providing your input?

    Thanks for all your help to all of us in need,

    Dave

  • Stephen

    Dr Dressler:

    Our 2 and 1/2 yr old female Leonberger was diagnosed with Cutaneous Hemaniosarcoma at 2 yrs.

    Long story short, she went through two operation of her thoracic area to get clean margins. We decided against Chemo. She is now on human food, taking 4000/day Omega 3, 2000/day Glucosamine & Condroitin with MSM, 2/day Vetri-Mega Probiotic and 1 scoop/day of Wholly Immune (Allergy Research Group). Now, three months post-surgery, Blood levels and organ function is all within normal range, her appetite and energy level are excellent and she is in great spirits.

    Two questions: 1) Can/should we be adding the Apocaps to her regime and 2) if/when we start her on a 1-week on, 3-weeks off dose of Artemisin/Artesunate, should we interrupt the Apocaps just as we will the Wholly Immune and Omega 3s?

    Your book “The Dog Cancer Survival Guide” has been a tremendous help and comfort as are your regular emails.

    Cheers
    Stephen

  • Kim

    Dr. Dressler,

    My dog, Buddy, an 8 yr. old golden retriever had lymphoma and I took him to UC Davis and did chemo and he recently passed away in November 2009. I now have a 7 month old golden male puppy and he’s large (65 lbs.) and I’ve been told to feed him puppy food for large breeds, but he really likes the grain free salmon and sweet potato food and I’m wondering what’s best for him to avoid cancer further down the road.

    I’m not fertilizing my lawn and I’m not using chemicals on the floor and I’m sure there’s a lot of people out there that want to know how to best prevent cancer in the first place. I also heard it’s best not to neuter him until he’s one, can you give me advise about that. One more thing, should he be on fish oil capsules now and how much?

    To sum it up – grain free?, fish oil capsules? and neutering?…

    Thanks, Kim

  • http://www.poopanonymous.com Randy Young

    my wife bought your book on cancer in animals ! Do you ever do interviews for other websites ?

    Thank You
    Randy Young
    CEO Emotitees
    I am already on your list of subscribers

  • Kim Gau

    Dr. Dressler,
    My beagle was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma last September. He had a splenectomy and no other treatments. Since then, I have followed your full spectrum care plan using various supplements you recommend, including K9 Immunity. I have a couple questions:
    1. When you mention that you need to stop supplements before a surgery, is a dental cleaning and tooth extraction considered “surgery” with regard to this issue?
    2. How does use of the Apocaps fit in with the diet/supplement portion of your book? In other words, can I use it with what I’m already doing? Should it not be mixed with anything in particular, e.g., as you mention in your book that certain supplements should not be used together; you must use one or the other.
    3. After 6 months he’s doing well but obviously this isn’t a cancer you can test for to see if it’s still lingering. So, is there will there ever be a point when you should stop using the “big guns” and/or anything else from your book? I believe I understood that these were treatment, not preventative, measures so you wouldn’t use these things on a healthy dog.
    Thank you so much for your work and your book and answering our personal questions. You’ve really made a difference for us! KIM

    • Dr. Dressler

      Dear Kim,

      1. Yes, tooth extraction involves potential bleeding and the possible “blood thinning” could make excessive bleeding an issue.
      2. The apocaps replace the whole Big Gun section. They can be used with K-9 Immunity concurrently. The are used on an ongoing basis.
      3. We don’t have the data to answer this sadly. One approach would be to continue for about another year and then start to taper off while monitoring closely with exams, lab tests and frequent ultrasounds every 2-3 months or so.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • karen frazier

    Dr. Dressler,
    Our dog Mcleod (sheltie) was given an ultrasound and diagnosed with a possible pancreatic cancer in Dec. with weeks to live. We read your book and others, researched and have been giving him K9 Immunity and the cottage cheese (Budwig Diet) and have to tell you that up until this week his energy and spirit was unbelievable. He kept bringing me his frisbee constantly to play with. I forgot to tell you but we have him on no fat meat with lamb and rice dog food which he loved and was always looking to eat more for when he was diagnosed he had stopped eating.
    This week his stool turned tan and then very rapidly it turned dark and gelly. He hasn’t eaten
    in three days and have given him liquids to keep him hydrated. He makes a very loud yell
    when vomiting and nothing comes out. We have also been giving him pepto bismol every
    six hours.
    I feel the inevitable is waiting and I don’t want him to suffer. It was confusing when the doctor
    in December gave him pain pills to take home to make this last weeks of his life comfortable
    and he has lived this long.
    We have been trying to save him with both no imcome from a job loss so we have to face the reality. We feel so blessed that god has allowed us to share his life. We have no children but feel God has given us the one of his most precious gift. A noble, kind, illegient, gentle soul who has been more precious than gold and really has blessed our life with his special love.
    Does a dog with a diseased pancreas need to purge his body by fasting this long?
    We initially thought because the doctor told us the results weren’t a definite but he concluded
    that he might of just had pacreatiis?
    Any advise I will appreciate and thanks so much for all you do for animals and getting the word out how important it is to feed and keep animals immune system up for a healty life.

  • Kay

    Hello, I am not sure how unique my story is compared to other dog owners, but I have researched endlessly for the past month and I have not found a similar story. The story is actually regarding my surviving 7 year old Basset Hound Daisy, but here is what happened which will lead up to my question. My boy Basset Hound, Benson was 9 years old when we put him to sleep last month. He had been back and forth to the vet and the emergency vet hospital on several occasions over the past 12 months. In January of 2010 I noticed he was not feeling well… shivering and drooling excessively- and I rushed him to the vet on a Saturday night. His fever was 107.3 along with an abnormal white blood count and an abnormal heart rate. The illness after 2 days, $2,000 and numerous tests was “undetermined fever/illness”. He was given an antibiotic and he got better quickly. On March 14th 2010 in the blink of an eye, he started shivering again, he couldnt move, and within hours he was diagnosed with Cancer and he was gone. This brings me to my question about my 7 year old Basset. About 12 months ago she started to really misbehave. She started to pee in the house. She did it every single night. She drank excessively so I thought she was becoming diabetic. I took her to the vet and they found nothing. No urinary infection, no bladder or kidney problems etc. On March 13th the night before we put her brother to sleep was the last time she peed in the house. Clearly she had started to smell his illness a year ago. Over the course of the year and as he got sicker, her drinking and peeing were out of control. She would almost pee in the house right in front of me. I have read that dogs can smell cancer in people, but I can not find any information on dogs that can smell cancer in another dog. Are there any articles on this subject? Also, through the course of the year whenever we would take the 9 year old to the vet, she would pace and cry and wait by the door for him to return, but when we took him from the house on the morning of the 14th, she knew that she would not see him again and she began to grieve right away. Her anxiety is completely gone now and she is totally lonely without him. One of the worst things for me was that I punished her for peeing in the house for a year- not realizing that she was just trying to tell me that her brother had cancer. Does anyone know about this subject?

  • Christina

    Hi Dr. D,
    You recommend oral enzymes in your book… I bought the digestive enzymes from Dr. Goodpet that you sprinkle on the food a 1/2 hr before, but what brand do you recommend that comes in pill form and when do you give it?

    Also, I just received Apocaps, and my dog Toby is taking Previcox which is helping with walking due to his Histiocytic Sarcoma on his elbow. You say to check with our vet before starting to take Apocaps… Is there a reaction that can happen?

    Thanks,
    Christina

  • Christina

    One more thing…. Assuming my onocologist says ok… I will give Toby Apocaps, Coryceps, indole 3 Carbinol, Both digestive enzymes, cimetidine,multivitamin, rotation of juven and Modified Citrus Pectin, rotation of Krill oil and Omega 3. He will be taking CCNU, should I also add Glutamine and Milk Thistle? Anything else? Because of the cost, is there anything that I can take out of the above list to help reduce costs?

    Thank you, Thank you!

    Cheers,
    Christina

  • Dr. Dressler

    Dear Christina,
    there is a FAQ on the website:
    http://www.apocaps.com
    Included there are both sheets for dog lovers and their vets. Bottom line is that reducing the dose of drugs like Previcox, under veterinary supervision, may be possible and is advised if using Apocaps concurrently. One way would be to drop the dose to a quarter and reassessing in 3 weeks to see if it is still needed.
    Can you help me understand the specific choice of glutamine? You could maybe toss it out if you want to save money..
    Best
    Dr D

  • Christina

    Hi Dr. D,
    Spoke with my onocologist today and he said he has never heard of Apocaps, and he was happy that I sent him the info for vets. We will be switching him from Previcox to Prednisone with CCNU, and I will let him know about reducing the dose by 25% and see what he says. Honestly, our onocologist does not seem to accepting of all the supplements that i want to give Toby, but i gave him the list I want to use and the only ones he said not to use were Tagamet (Pepsid instead with CCNU) and Apocaps because it said on your label to not give with Anti- Inflammatory drugs.
    I asked him about any supplements to help with the liver and he prescribed Denamarin.
    Thank you for your advice! Have a nice rest of the week!
    Christina

    • Dr. Dressler

      Hi Christina,
      In the world of vocations, we usually use what we are most familiar with . A surgeon will lean towards a scalpel. It can be said that some oncologists are not particularly open to supplements, while others are quite open and well versed in their use. Sadly there is a general lack of studies on interactions between supplements and conventional chemotherapy drugs in both human and veterinary oncology. However there are studies that show benefits…my opinion is that when we are dealing with treatments that don’t produce actual resolution (cures) or very long remissions, I lean towards getting any edge possible, especially if what is being used has a high safety margin.
      Always work with your health professional. It may be worthwhile seeking out an oncologist with an integrative approach. I am unable to make specific dog recommendations, but I have started with a quarter of the dose of Apocaps in my own patients with NSAIDS and then worked up gradually over 4-6 weeks, while watching for vomiting, diarrhea or loss of appetite. Giving Apocaps with a full meal can help in these patients as well. Cytotec can be used to help as well (prescription). Again, my advices is that this should be done with your vet or onc involved, as with any medical care for your dog.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Joy Hoffman

    Hi,

    My 7 year old 40 pound cocker spaniel may have osteosarcoma. He was started last year on 100 mg of Atopica and I was wondering if this could have had anything to do with him getting cancer.

    Thanks,
    Joy

  • Dar

    well I just wanted to let you know, that Lucky only lasted 2 mths after finding out about the lymphnod cancer. Now both my baby’s are gone with in two months of each other. I miss them dearly. I will get another friend just not right now. I will be getting two rescue dogs. I liked have them together. so that they are not alone when i am at work. so If you know of any sites i can look around in; I would be very thankful. (Michigan) I will kept reading your post and updates. Thank you very much for all the information you have given me.

    sincerely,
    Dar

    • Dr. Dressler

      Dear Dar,
      I am so sorry to hear this heartbreaking news. My thoughts are with you.
      I always suggest that people get a dog from a shelter (or two dogs if that suits you), such as rescue groups, the Humane Society, or the SPCA.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Joy Hoffman

    I’ve noticed Dr. Dressler responds to many comments, however mine went unnoticed. I am a bit sad because of that. I hope it was unintentional.

    As of today my dog Champ has had his spleen removed and diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma (1 inch mass). The primary site is the spleen and secondary in the left rear femur. There were no other lesions visualized during the splenectomy and non visible on chest x-rays or other full body x rays. He is not acting different (no lethargy, loves his food and very energetic).

    I am wondering if Dr. Dressler thinks a leg amputation and chemo (Doxorubicin) would be in Champ’s best interest. He is only 8. Pain meds have still left him with a limp so he is obviously still in pain. The leg amputation would alleviate the pain. The chemo would hopefully fight any microscopic bloodbourne cancer cells.

    I am not ready to let him go. He is not ready either. After chemo is over I am also looking to start him on a homemade diet and some type of meds to help him immune system continue to fight the cancern. I would like his opinions on my options.

    Thanks,
    Joy Hoffman

  • Allen Depta

    Dr. Dressler, statistics will tell us that 2out of 3 dogs get cancer over their life time.
    I suspect that the food we buy commercially, under hundreds and hundreds of labels all contain a an ingredient to make it palatable…..this ingredient is most likely a carcinogen, that given constantly over years years, under the right condition will cause some type of cancer……so back to home cooking………

    What do you think about my theory ?

    Allen Depta

  • Stan and Charleen Lawrence

    Dr. Dressler,

    We are friends of Kristi Kapahulehua. She spoke to you last week about our Siberian Husky Blanca Rose. We enjoyed your webinar this afternoon. I have included excerpts of the various reports regarding Blanca. We both appreciate your reviewing this information. We are in need of guidance. We are reading your book and working through what type of guardians we are.

    Here are the specifics:
    Visualized mass within 2cm of the trachea immediately caudal to and partially involving the vocal fold on the left side, sessile mass but irregular partially ulcerated region extending into the lumen of the trachea, normal laryngeal motion.De bulking laryngeal/tracheal mass. De-bulked 80% of the mass with only the ventral regions of the mass remaining. Mass was submitted for biopsy.

    Biopsy results summarized:
    Received fragments of portions of a mucosal epithelial neoplasm taken form immediately caudal to the left arytenoid. Tumor cells are pleomorphic polyhedral epithelial cells arranged in densely packed lobules, nests and small sheets, supported by a scant and delicate vascular stoma. Tumor cells have mild aniscytosis and anisokaryosis with scant to moderate pale amphophilic vacuolated cytoplasm. Microscopic Interpretation: Malignant carcinoma, necrotic, inflamed, with active hemorrhage, tumor tissue extends to margins.The presence of a few rudimentary tubular structures in this epithelial malignancy of the laryngotracheal region suggest a submucosal seromucous gland origin. The tumor demonstrates features of an intermediate or higher grade malignancy and a very guarded prognosis is likely warranted.

    Blanca underwent a CT scan and X-rays last Tuesday t determine size of remaining tumor and to check for metastases within her system. Here are the results: Diagnosis – subarytenoid carcinoma The cardiac silhouette, pulmonary vasculature, lung parenchyma, and extra-thoracic structures are with normal limits. Conclusion – Normal Thorax.
    Oncologist is suggesting chemo as a initial course of action. A total of 6 treatments every 3 weeks utilizing “Carboplatin – 300 mg/m2 IV”. Possible palliative radiation course in the future of 5 days – 5 fractions x 4 Gy M-F sched.

    I hope that I have captured the pertinent information. I have all of reports and detail in a PDF file.

    At this point Blanca seems to be happy, is talking, still loves to go swimming and play tug of war. Here appetite is normal, as are her urination and bowel movements.

    Thank you for your help and guidance.

    Stan and Charleen Lawrence

  • Dar

    Dr. D
    (try this again). I sent the last one with no text. ok. I am thinking about getting a dog from my sister. Which is were i got lucky.(lymphnod cancer) This would be lucky’s Aunt who had the puppies. (so lucky’s cousin) how likely is this puppie to get cancer?
    sincerly,
    dar

  • DIANE CORBETT

    OUR DOG DIVOT HAS A VERY AGGRESSIVE CASE OF SINUS CANCER. WE REALLY HAD NO HOPE EVEN AFTER TAKING HIM TO 2 VETS AND SPECIALIST. A VET HERE IN HOUSTON ON STUBNER WAS WILLING TO HELP US OUT. THEY HAVE DONE SEVERAL PROCEDURES AND DIVOT IS ON NEOPLASTINE. I WANT EVERYONE TO KNOW THAT HE HAS SHOWN A HUGE IMPROVEMENT WHEN I STARTED PUTTING IT IN CAPSULES BECAUSE IT UPSET HIS STOMACH SO MUCH. IT HAS WORKED GREAT AND THIS HAS BEEN GREAT! HE IS ALSO HAVING LAZER TREATMENTS BY OUR VET WHO DIVOT LOVES WITH ALL OF HEART HE RUNS TO THE DOOR TO SEE HIM! THEY HAVE BONDED. HE HAS BEEN A BLESSING TO US AND DIVOT. VETERANS MEMORAIL ANIMAL HOSPITAL IS WHERE HE IS BEING TREATED DR. DAN AHRENS. HE DOES NOT TAKE NEW PATIENTS BUT HE TOOK DIVOT BECAUSE HE WAS SO SICK. IF YOU CAN HANDEL THE TUMORS COMING OUT LIKE BOILS AND EXPLODE AND LEAVE HOLES IN THEIR HEADS IF YOU GET PAST THAT IT LOOKS LIKE WE ARE COMING OUT WINNERS AGAINST CANCER THANKS SO MUCH FOR GIVING ME THE NAME OF NEOPLASTINE

  • Barbara O’Quinn

    Dr. D, my 9-year-old Jack Russell almost died last September before finally being diagnosed with lymphosarcoma. I was lucky enough to find a vet (only 70 miles away from my rural home) who does chemo, and Rambo was saved and is doing incredibly well except for one problem: he has the urinary side effects that are apparently caused by his cyclophosphamide. He takes 5mg of prednisone every other day, and the vet has had us feeding him Hill’s s/d canned food in hopes of helping, but is there anything else you can suggest to help with this problem? Your book has been a real blessing to me during this much-loved boy’s horrible illness, so thank you so much for writing it!

  • Leroy Twisdale

    Dr. Dressler, I really need some direction and advice. I have a two year old Bassett/Lab mix male who has been diagnosed with REHABDOMYOSARCOMA (BUTRYOID SUBTYPE) in his bladder. It is located at the TRIGON area. He has had two procedures to debulk the growth. He does really well after each procedure urinating, but after 3 or 4 months, the same thing occurrs again. He is currently taking PEROXICAM once a day. He shows no other abnormalities. His appetite and stools are normal. Any suggestions. I dont know if I am doing him any harm subjecting him to the debulking process each time. Thank you for your time. Mr. Twisdale

  • Nick Aperghis

    Dear Dr. Dressler:
    Your views, book and blog, to me is more than treating dog cancer. In a way is how to handle life when crisis sets in. Cancer in my dog is big crisis for me. You have helped me more than you would have hoped for. Your book guided me to treat mast cell tumor in my pug. The tumors were cut out by surgery and biopsy showed grade 1, thank god. He now follows your dog cancer diet and he is on apocaps. I hope he makes it. A big bravo to you. You are the best in your area in my eyes, but mostly in my heart. I will recommend you to anyone who faces cancer with his dog. One issue. You have recommended Hill’s n/d food for convenience. I strongly believe that industrial food of any sort is a big contributor to dog cancer. Nothing can replace home made food, and I hope one day you recommend nothing else but home made food not only to dogs with cancer but for all dogs.
    May you be blessed.

    Nick from Athens Greece.

    p.s. Am I doing the right thing giving my dog apocaps although he was diagnosed just with grade 1? For how long?

  • Maggie

    Hi Dr. D
    really hopin you read and answer my inquiry asap. I have had one of the most devastating and stressful weeks of my life. My almost 10yr old shihtzu, Bailey was not feeling well over the weekend. He was fine than suddenly lethargic had not wanted to eat at all not even hand fed as I usually do when he refuses to eat from his bowl (this has happened for the last few months I thought it was due to the heat….I live in Northeast PA and also reside in NY) anyway he was having difficulty with bowel movement, vomitted some time last week. The last couple of baths I gave him I had noticed I was feeling his rib cage and spine as if he were deteriorating but confused because he had sort of a pot belly. I feared a tumor so I kept feeling for one but he didn’t complain of pain and I was feeling anything moving or a mass, so I was hopeful as I keep my boys (I have 2 shihtzu’s) pretty healthy …..they never missed their annuals vaccinations always give them their heartgard every month feed them only Eukanuba kibble…maintenance and now the senior level for small breeds purified water, brush their teeth provide chew toys (even though one has pretty bad tartar build up and had to extract a tooth,,,he hates chew toys unless they are digestable) bailey was always complimented on his teeth for an older dog as he frequently chews, so I was positive but had a strong bad feeling in my heart. Took him to his vet this week he was due his shots but I immediatley mentioned I was concerned with Bailey seemed depressed has not eaten in a few days (3) did drink a great deal of water that morning, urinated but no poop. The vet checked his temp. he had no fever….I mentioned he seemed to lose weight and I feel his bones which I never experienced with him before but yet his belly was oddly big….when the vet felt him he had an alarming look on his face and said he didn’t like how that felt and immediately took him in the back to take a blood sample as well as X-ray and opted not to give his vaccinations in this visit since he had not been feeling well. After a while of waitingg he called me to the back to view the x-ray….lil did I know that what I had been feeling around for a tumor at home was itself a massive tumor that was the size of his entire body. In the X-ray he showed me what was this mass tumor crushing his stomach and intestines and other organs preventing him from being able to eat, digest and pass stool. I was horrified and immediately felt faint. I asked if it were cancerous he responded that is not something that can be determined through blood work or x-ray but the blood work will help determine the functions of the other organs if in fact there was anyh abnormalities than cander could be a possibility as the organs are being affected his hopes were worst case scenario its a splenatic tumor mass that could only be determined by exploratory surgery and remove the spleen to completely remove tumor and send for biopsy to determine malignant or benign. His blood work came back all good, lungs, liver, kidney with the exception that he did appear anemic. We wasted no time he went into surgery…I was a mess as he is my first baby whom I love as if I birthed him and he is extremely attached to me, the vet found this a bit odd as he has seen this mostly in larger breed dogs rare small breeds. I was called after his surgery that they were able to remove the spleen it was in fact a tumor growth on his spleen and removed safely but because of his little size he lost alot of blood and very week but while recovering from the surgery and anesthesia he stood up on his own and the vet thought it be a good Idea to come see him so he could feel at ease. I got there as soon as I could, my 8 yr old took him her blanky that hd her scent, and his favorite toy to keep in his crate. As soon as he saw me he wanted to jump to me and we kept him from doing so, as the dr. showed me the mass he removed I was horrified at how large this tumor was and couldn’t believe that large mass was inside of that lil body. It was literally the size of his entire body…..I still can’t understand how such a hug mass was able to fit such a small body and how he survived all this time. Than my Bailey let out a loud yelp and just fell with his eyes open and limp the doctor kept shaking him and was able to feel a pulse moved him in the crate and had me leave room he felt the visit was overwhelming he said he was still in critical we could still lose him he was very weak loss of blood hoping to get him alert within next 24 hrs or by next morning latest or he may have to consider transfusion, kept him overnight I cried all the way home. Waited at home anxiously until I heard from the dr. that evening…..he said Bailey was able to stand up and drink some water on his own so that was a good sign but he wouldn’t be happy till he got him to eat, poop and move around more frequent. he mention the biopsy wld be available in 3-4 days but tht wasn’t his concern as much as getting Bailey strength back up from what he removed he didn’t think it was malignant in his opinion it looked benigh but testing was for confirmation. I have been on computer allnight doing research I am getting conflicting reports if malignant with splenectomy only the survival rate is 19-60 days with chemo 292 days, if benign survival up to a year after splenectomy and some said with splenectomy curative and should live normal life after. Some seemed it indicate that even if benigh, chemo with alternative medicines but still short life span. I don’t know what to believe….your blog site gave me some assurance in regards to other cancers but I didn’t see much in regards to Hemangiomas splenectomy, what prognosis is given afterwards to help them live healthy and extend their life span if possible. Please give me some feedback as I am still an emotional mess and dealing with another dog at home very depressed that his brother/buddy is not around and we are hoping for a speedy recovery for bailey as we are not ready to see him go either. prior to this my bailey was a very active playful and loving dog, people were often shocked he was turning 10 soon and thought he was younger….please respond to my comments as it would be greatly appreciated. I have read up on your dogcancerdiet and it seems like a great way to go and I would like to know if this would be extremely beneficial to Bailey if an when he returns home (i’m keeping faith he will).
    regards,
    Maggie mom of Shihtzu Bailey.

  • Leroy Twisdale

    Dear Dr. Dressler, I submitted a comment on July 28 2010 but received no answer. I know you are a very busy man, but I would appreciate a comment and any suggestions that you may have about this situation. Thank you for your valuable time and the wonderful things you do for animals and their owners. Mr. Twisdale

  • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

    Dear Mr. Twisdale,
    Is there harm from continued debulking? Likely this is better than the alternative. Thus, in the overall analysis, debulking would win. However, I wonder what other steps are being taken to get an edge on this cancer? Is your dog on the Dog Cancer Diet? Are you using Apocaps (you would want to drop the dose of piroxicam to 1/4 of what is is currently obviously under veterinary supervision). Alternating Apocaps with artemisinin? What immune support is there? Low dose doxycycline? High dose omega 3 supplementation? Implantation of Matrix cisplatin impregated beeds during the next debulking (these can be found on line)? Intraoperative radiation at a referrral center? Chemotherapy? These are some options that pop up in my mind. I am not suggesting that these will cure your dog, but are things that may lessen the number of surgeries needed or increase your dog’s life expectancy and overall life quality. Most are discussed in the Guide.
    Best,
    Dr D

  • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

    Dear Maggie,
    So sorry to hear this shocking story. There is just no way that anyone could be prepared for this experience. I’ll give you some rough figures to work with based on conventional care alone. These do not apply to individual dogs, they only apply to a whole group of dogs with this problem, so these numbers should be taken with a grain of salt. They also do not apply to the full spectrum approach in the Guide which I suggest you take the time to read if you are interested in learning what else you can do to get an edge.
    rough median survival times for splenic hemangiosarcoma:
    splenectomy only: about 2-3 months roughly
    splenectomy with chemotherapy: roughly 6-7 months
    It is time for you to step up and get the information you need to handle all the different pieces of this chapter in life.
    Best,
    Dr D

  • http://www.gorrmaedobermans.com Lori

    A young (only 15 month old Doberman ) bitch that I bred just lost her battle with T Cell Lympoma. This is one hard pill to swallow, not only for me, but her owner…Could you shed some light on how, why, or any logical reason a dog so young would get something like this…?
    She was diagnosed in July, after her owner noticed a small lump on her throat, then a couple days later the right side of her face swelled up. After tests and slides, it was confirmed and she started on Chemo…the chemo put her into remission for 3 weeks, then it came back with a vengence…nothing worked..from diagnoses to loss, was only two months…this is so heartbreaking..From readings, talking to vets, this is a common cancer in dogs, but usually in older dogs and usually it is BCell which supposedly easier to treat,…..We (her owner and myself) are trying to understand, why or how she could have gotten this horrible heartbreaking disease, and it had anything to do with her genetics, her environment or anything…we are grief stricken…Do you have any answers from your experiences?

  • http://palladia.com bennie zacek, dvm

    Are there any contraindications for using the parasiticide, drontal plus, while patient is being treated w/ Palladia?

  • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

    Dear Dr. Zacek,
    I am not aware of published or anectodal contraindications for the use of Drontal Plus with Palladia. Thanks for tuning in!
    Best,
    Dr D

  • S Wilson

    Doctor: Our 6 year old female Lab just had her second last cell tumor (grade 1, clean margins) removed from her hind elbow a few weeks ago. Her first was removed about 10 months prior on her belly. To my surprise, I just found out that when the first tumor was removed, it was never sent into the lab. When it was aspirated, the vet said it was mct and removed it. My dog is also very, very itchy (ears, gnaws on paws, anals -which are empty). I groom her daily and give her two benedryls in the morning and evening. Questions: 1) She has had 2 mct’s in a year – what could this mean? 2) Could the itching be related? 3)In the event it is sheer allergies, could you recommend a commercial diet (she’s on sensitive skin diets – but it doesn’t help. Thank you. S. Wilson

  • Barbara Kerkhoff

    Hi Dr Dressler:
    I am a new subscriber. We adopted an approximately 5-year old Australian
    Cattle Dog/Border Collie mix about 6 months ago through a rescue organization. She’s a wonderful girl and she and our 5 year old Treeing Walker Coonhound mix (Angel) have become great pals. Nicole seemed in great shape. Imagine my surprise when I took her to the vet over my concern of what I thought was a foxtail up her nose to find that the vet discovered a lump, first thought to be a mammary gland tumor (she had been spayed later in life). Turned out to be a well-differentiated Grade 1 mast cell tumor on her ventral abdomen. Margins were clear. The lab report says that the sections reveal an infiltrative, mildely anaplastic growth of mast cells which contain regular, uniform,
    spherical nuclei and metachromatic granules. Variable numbers eosinophils are encountered. The edges of the mass lesion do not appear very well circumscribed suggesting some invasiveness into surrounding tissue, Mitoses are not a feature. The mass involves the dermis and subcutis. Sections also include some fairly inactive mammary-type tissue. The lab also commented that the growth pattern is by diffuse effacement of contiguous tissue along collagen planes rather than by expansion. This is all double-dutch to me. My vet said that this is not really, really bad – but – the lab report prognosis says: Fair.
    That’s pretty close to bad, no? I just bought your book and am working my way through it. Nicole gets her stitches out on Wednesday. She is not in any
    discomfort – has a whale of an appetite and lots of energy. Do you have any suggestions please – and can you decipher in English what the lab report means. Thank you much. Sincerely, Barbara Kerkhoff, Somis, California

  • Mary

    Dr Dressler – Thank you for this very informative website. My dog Shadow was recently diagnosed with a low grade oral melanoma.(near front fang) He is 15 so I opted to have it surgically debulked to avoid the major surgery with partial jaw removal. I’ve switched him to your cancer diet. In addition he is on several supplements from Standard Process including whole body, thyroid, renal, Immuplex and cardiac. In addition he is taking an amino acid supplement, vitamin b and astragalus. I also give him a squirt of coconut oil each day. I’m wondering if you think the Apocaps would be an added benefit for him or supplement overload? Also how do you feel about Neoplasene? I can not afford the melanoma vaccine but want to do all I can to help him. He is my heart dog and I am already distraught at the idea of losing him. If you have any thoughts on a way to help him I would love to hear it.

    Thank you very much,
    Mary

  • Jan Angers

    In Memoriam
    You Have to Love a Collie to Understand
    We have had three females named Lady, but I must tell you about the very first Lady. In the early 1960’s my husband (Brad) was driving through a park and noticed two dogs walking around in traffic on a very busy street. They looked like they were lost. One was a small dog and one was a collie. A neighbor stopped by and happened to notice that my husband was trying to round up the dogs and get them to safety. The neighbor said she would help the smaller dog if my husband would take the collie (we had a station wagon).
    When my husband called the collie she jumped into the station wagon with no problem and when Brad took her to a safer area to let her out, she wouldn’t get out. (I guessed she already made up her mind who she wanted to be with) So Brad brought her home. Well, as soon as I saw her, I wanted to keep her. She was dirty, unkept and a little thin, but to me, beautiful. We tried for several days to find where she lived. We called the animal shelters and ran an ad. Finally after asking neighbors and their kids we were able to locate her owners. That afternoon we tried to contact her owner, but no one was home. We looked around the house and found a big metal stake with a chain and collar laying in a deep circular rut dug around the pole. Later that night we visited the owner and told her about finding her dog in the freeway. The owner said “Oh that dog, she’s always getting out and always in trouble. I don’t know what I am going to do with her.” Well, we knew this was the time to ask her if she wanted to sell her. (She immediately became a very valuable dog) After a little negotiating, we bought her.
    I know my husband thought he was buying her for me but that was not to be the case. Brad and Lady were like two peas in a pod. Always playing, always kissing, always very loving. She never wanted to leave him. When Brad went for a drive in his corvette, Lady jumped in on the passenger side before I could get in and looked at me ‘like go away, this is my time’. (I still got my share of love from her)
    One day when I was at work, Brad answered the door bell and a magazine salesman was trying to peddle his wares. Brad said no and closed the door and went out to the kitchen to fix a sandwich. The salesman apparently decided to come in uninvited and Lady ran quickly into the living room and grabbed the salesman’s throat, ripping some of the skin. The salesman left in a hurry and complained to the police. Later we found out the salesman had been entering a lot of houses around the neighborhood uninvited. Lady knew he was up to no good. She was always so gentle around everyone else, this was such a surprise! (The police commended her for the capture.)
    On another occasion, we had a friend who would come over to visit us and Lady never liked him from the beginning. Later we found out he was a nasty person with a very mean streak. Other times she would let us know people she didn’t trust and believe it or not she was always right.
    There was the memorable time when she had a litter of pups in her “box” in a guest room. We always came running when we herd any commotion. One day I had just taken a large baked ham out of the oven and had it on the counter preparing to slice, when we heard the puppies making a fuss. My husband and I both ran to the “box” and found everything ok. We returned to the kitchen only to find Lady making a meal of our ham. Too damn smart we thought.
    Many years later we noticed a little lump in her neck area. We took her to our vet. The report was not good. Our veterinarians diagnosis was confirmed by other clinics. Lady, now a ten year old collie, had lymph-sarcoma, an incurable form of cancer. My husband and I were devastated. We consulted M.D. Anderson in Houston and Texas A & M University all to no avail.
    Then we received a call from Dr. Amanullah Kahn at Wadley Blood Research in Dallas. He told us of their ongoing research with cancer fighting drugs. Lady was immediately accepted for a series of experimental treatments. For over a year she made her twice weekly trips to the clinic. Each time taking time to visit the rooms of every child at the clinic. The doctors and nurses looked forward to her visits. She was a model patient.
    Then the unthinkable happened. A new vet who was unfamiliar with Ladys case, by accident, administered live virus at the time of her annual shots. She passed away almost immediately. Again a dark cloud hung over our family.
    A few days later we received a call from the Dr’s Ted & Ellen Loeb, Directors of Wadley Research, asking us to visit with them. While in their office several children came in to say hello. After they had left Dr. Loeb said they knew how we felt about the loss of Lady and they wanted my husband and I to meet these children. She said that those children were alive because of what they had learned from Lady. Then, and only then, did I realize that Lady had completed her mission. Her life did mean something.
    My wife and I donated a color TV for the childrens ward in Lady’s name. She would have wanted the children to have it.
    Lady has since been replaced with a playmate for our male collie, Texas, but as with any collie lover, you can understand, she can never be replaced in our hearts

  • robert smith

    can Metformin, which was recently in the news as a cancer prevention, and possible cancer treatment drug, be used for dog cancer. Would it get along with oral sodium dichloroacetate in water (Mikelakis et al U of Alberta) Both compounds are generic compounds, so no drug company will ever push them. I believe that if they get along in the body, there is a chance they would shut down cancer’s energy supply. The sodium dichloroacetate shuts down extra mitochondrial energy production in cancer cells and turns the mitochondria back on. The Metformin lowers the glucose levels in the blood, so starving the cancer of its rocket fuel, sugar. Metformin also acts on mTOR, and maybe Rapamycin or Ribavirin would assist in that. Cancer’s energy requirements are the same as a fetus in the first trimester, which is why they use the same method to metabolize sugar, because normal mitochondrial sugar metabolism is simply not fast enough to meet the programmed growth rate of neither the tumor or the fetus. (Otto Warburg was right).

  • Jan Angers

    In Memoriam

    You Have to Love a Collie to Understand
    We have had three females named Lady, but I must tell you about the very first Lady. In the early 1960’s my husband (Brad) was driving through a park and noticed two dogs walking around in traffic on a very busy street. They looked like they were lost. One was a small dog and one was a collie. A neighbor stopped by and happened to notice that my husband was trying to round up the dogs and get them to safety. The neighbor said she would help the smaller dog if my husband would take the collie (we had a station wagon).
    When my husband called the collie she jumped into the station wagon with no problem and when Brad took her to a safer area to let her out, she wouldn’t get out. (I guessed she already made up her mind who she wanted to be with) So Brad brought her home. Well, as soon as I saw her, I wanted to keep her. She was dirty, unkept and a little thin, but to me, beautiful. We tried for several days to find where she lived. We called the animal shelters and ran an ad. Finally after asking neighbors and their kids we were able to locate her owners. That afternoon we tried to contact her owner, but no one was home. We looked around the house and found a big metal stake with a chain and collar laying in a deep circular rut dug around the pole. Later that night we visited the owner and told her about finding her dog in the freeway. The owner said “Oh that dog, she’s always getting out and always in trouble. I don’t know what I am going to do with her.” Well, we knew this was the time to ask her if she wanted to sell her. (She immediately became a very valuable dog) After a little negotiating, we bought her.
    I know my husband thought he was buying her for me but that was not to be the case. Brad and Lady were like two peas in a pod. Always playing, always kissing, always very loving. She never wanted to leave him. When Brad went for a drive in his corvette, Lady jumped in on the passenger side before I could get in and looked at me ‘like go away, this is my time’. (I still got my share of love from her)
    One day when I was at work, Brad answered the door bell and a magazine salesman was trying to peddle his wares. Brad said no and closed the door and went out to the kitchen to fix a sandwich. The salesman apparently decided to come in uninvited and Lady ran quickly into the living room and grabbed the salesman’s throat, ripping some of the skin. The salesman left in a hurry and complained to the police. Later we found out the salesman had been entering a lot of houses around the neighborhood uninvited. Lady knew he was up to no good. She was always so gentle around everyone else, this was such a surprise! (The police commended her for the capture.)
    On another occasion, we had a friend who would come over to visit us and Lady never liked him from the beginning. Later we found out he was a nasty person with a very mean streak. Other times she would let us know people she didn’t trust and believe it or not she was always right.
    There was the memorable time when she had a litter of pups in her “box” in a guest room. We always came running when we herd any commotion. One day I had just taken a large baked ham out of the oven and had it on the counter preparing to slice, when we heard the puppies making a fuss. My husband and I both ran to the “box” and found everything ok. We returned to the kitchen only to find Lady making a meal of our ham. Too damn smart we thought.
    Many years later we noticed a little lump in her neck area. We took her to our vet. The report was not good. Our veterinarians diagnosis was confirmed by other clinics. Lady, now a ten year old collie, had lymph-sarcoma, an incurable form of cancer. My husband and I were devastated. We consulted M.D. Anderson in Houston and Texas A & M University all to no avail.
    Then we received a call from Dr. Amanullah Kahn at Wadley Blood Research in Dallas. He told us of their ongoing research with cancer fighting drugs. Lady was immediately accepted for a series of experimental treatments. For over a year she made her twice weekly trips to the clinic. Each time taking time to visit the rooms of every child at the clinic. The doctors and nurses looked forward to her visits. She was a model patient.
    Then the unthinkable happened. A new vet who was unfamiliar with Ladys case, by accident, administered live virus at the time of her annual shots. She passed away almost immediately. Again a dark cloud hung over our family.
    A few days later we received a call from the Dr’s Ted & Ellen Loeb, Directors of Wadley Research, asking us to visit with them. While in their office several children came in to say hello. After they had left Dr. Loeb said they knew how we felt about the loss of Lady and they wanted my husband and I to meet these children. She said that those children were alive because of what they had learned from Lady. Then, and only then, did I realize that Lady had completed her mission. Her life did mean something.
    My wife and I donated a color TV for the childrens ward in Lady’s name. She would have wanted the children to have it.
    Lady has since been replaced with a playmate for our male collie, Texas, but as with any collie lover, you can understand, she can never be replaced in our hearts

  • Nathanne Verner

    Dear Dr. Dressler,
    Our 7 year old Rottweller, Breezy, was diagnosed with osteo sarcoma two weeks ago after a biopsy. Problem is the tumor is on her forehead, has pushed one eye back, and is now making it hard for her to eat without pain medication. The cancer is not in her lungs yet. I ordered Apocaps for her, she’s big, over 100 lbs., so I give her 3 pills 3 times a day. The tumor is inoperable because it’s in her forehead cavity. She is having such a tough time, and I was wondering how long it takes for the Apocaps to kick in to shrink the tumor. The vet said that chemo and/or radiation would only buy her a little more time, but not enough to be worth putting her thorugh it.

    This is breaking our hearts, she’s a wonderful dog. How much longer is it wise to keep her going with pain pills and Apocaps before we have to put her to sleep?

    Thank you

    Thank you.

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Nathanne,
      I am so sorry to hear this news about Breezy. There are blog posts that I think you should read here and here and here too.
      I hope these help you
      Best
      Dr D

  • Karen V

    Dr. Dressler,
    Thanks for the great information in your book!
    How do you feel about the use of Burdock and Sheep sorrel for a labrador with hemangiosarcoma?
    What about digestive enzymes?
    Thank you,
    Karen

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Karen,
      Burdock has some nice properties, although the anticancer evidence is not as strong as the consituents in Apocaps and the other “big guns” you read about in the Guide. Digestive enzymes are included in the guide too, so I do use them, usually Wobenzyme N. Sheep sorrel is pretty wimpy in my view.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Kathryn Estey

    Pippa, our 11-yr-old Maltese, has just been diagnosed with a low-grade chronic lymphoma. She has started daily oral chemotherapy using a single drug: chlorambucil (Leukeran). I purchased Dr. Dressler’s Dog Cancer Survival Guide and am putting many of his suggestions into practice regarding diet and supplements. I do have a question regarding Wobenzym N capsules: Wobenzym doesn’t seem to exist in capsule form any more. Even when a web page advertises Wobenzym capsules, when you read the fine print they are referred to as enteric-coated tablets. Can these be crushed and divided up into smaller portions without the enzyme becoming degraded?
    Thanks!

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Kathryn,
      the short answer to this question is yes, you can grind them up.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Karl Hough

    Dr. Dressler
    I took my dog to Purdue University of Veterinary Medicine today for an exam and work up for my dog Spinner, he has Oral Melanonmia on the lower back part of his jaw, the tumor grows rapidly since last week . The biopsy did say it was Melanomia and consists of a high amount of cells, as of today we have ruled out taking part of the jaw out, my dod is 13 yrs old but he is strong as a bul, and enjoys his many walks and loves to play fetch. They did a complete workup at PURDUE and see no sigh yet of spreading of cells into the lungs or liver , they did find a small nodule in his spleen but the oncologist was not worried at all about it because of it’s structure or shape i think she said and she only spent like 5 sec or less on that , they did asperate his lymph nodes in his throat , one was a little swollen but they have not gotten the results yet, tomorrow they do a ct scan of his neck and shoulder area and part of his trunk i think she said. At this time she said that they would probably because of size and the fact it was high on the scale of cells or something like that , they would use Palliative Radiation, along with my expressed withes to use the new Melanomia vaccine. I am somewhat disappointed for i feel like Palliative treatments is like giving up, I know it is used mostly for pain control and some shrinkage but not to go full bore and try to win this battle, I am going to be spending a lot of money and love my dog dearly so i feel like they should have more tratments with a higher end fraction level than just doing lower fraction radiation that will not do much i feel and have read many places it does not really fight the cancer but it just helps with pain and many shrinkage .. If you were me would you ask as i already have expressed my concerns to the oncologist that i feel there only going half way and basically putting a small band aid on a large wound and i feel like i am here for my dog to try and win this battle even if ultimatly it fails? I have yet to talk to the radiation oncologist but i definetly have said my piece with the onclogist (Not radiation oncologist) that i feel they are kinda giving up or that they think it is too large to be of any help to do more treatments at maybe lower levels but more fraction rate in the end. What would you do if you were me, would you demand more treaments and more of an attitude of lets go in this to win and not to just come out as a stalemate if you would. I even talked to the oncologist about EGCG and Luteolin and she had no idea what they were :( she said she would try to read some about EGCG but i have a feeling she will be to busy to mess with it, and i am going to one of the best Veterinary schools in my area (Indiana) but i sorta feel like they have already given up before they got started and i am very sad. I will still when i get some give my dog EGCG , doubt about the Lutimax for it takes so many capsules to give my dog he is 82 lbs and 10-12 capsules a day is more than i can do, but the EGCG is a lot easier to give since i would only have to give him one capsule or two daily as i read in your book, which i downloaded and had printed for me, i am thankfull for this book. Also if i just give spinner your Apocaps would this be ok to just give him this as opposed to giving him EGCG or should i give both?

    I hope you respond to my desperate plea for help, i do not know what i should do and this is the only place (PURDUE UNIVERSITY VETERINARY SCHOOL Of MEDICINE) that i can take him too.

    Sincerely
    Karl Hough

  • David Scott

    Can someone clarify the dosage instructions for administering Curcumin; instructions are on p 198-199 of Dr Dresslers book and are as follows: “empty a capsule (of curcumin), add 1-2 teaspoons Liquid Soy Lecithin…and water”. The dosage is then, for small breeds: 100mg, 3 times daily.
    Is he referring to the mixture…or to the actual amount of curcumin? The only Curcumin I can find comes in 665mg tablets….so one dose would be 1/6 of a capsult…..pretty hard to do??
    Thanks,
    Mr Max’s dad

  • barbara harris

    Dr. Dr. Dressler.
    My rescued 3 year old mixed breed was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in December and had her right hind leg amputated. Since then, I am following your home made diet, adding digestive enzymes, vitamins, omega qd, pine bark, apocaps and k9 immunity. We opted not to have chemotherapy. She is like a puppy again, and flying around with only 3 legs. We had a chest xray at the time of surgery, but it was negative, as of now. I have two questions. What is your thoughts about natural flea and tick control for dogs and should I continue with the heart worm wafers every month. Do you have any other suggestions for Macy? Thank you for such an informative and inspiring book.
    Sincerely, Barbara Harris

  • Trixie Bliss-Sajor

    In Memoriam of Sasha
    I would like to thank you for all the research you have done and for your cancer diet. Our Sasha had Osteosarcoma, she had one toe removed on her hind, left foot. The surgery was sucessful, unfortunately our vet found 2 small nodules on her lymph nodes by her lungs. Our vet has been keeping up with your cancer research and was very helpful and caring. We started Sasha on the cancer diet immeditately. (Jan.2011) Sasha was feed liver, lean chicken, fish, brown rice and old fashion oatmeal. The califlower, broccoli and shitaki (sun dried) mushrooms were put through the food processor. I added some Organic Whey Protein to each meal.
    Sasha did well on this diet. Unfortunately she had TMJ and I had to say good bye to my baby on May 27 2011. My vet and I compared the size of the nodules from her first x-ray with the last x-rays taken. The cancer had not progressed, the sizes of the nodules had NOT increased. The cancer diet was working and Sasha was doing great on it.
    Sasha was a miniature red-nose pitbull with the most beautiful smile and a loving, gentle nature. She gave so much not only to me but to so many others. She was much loved and will be missed. There was a song done by Bad English-”When I See You Smile” that was my Sasha’s song because it fit her to a “T”. She helped me to “face the world” and made everything alright again. She was so very special and I was blessed to have her in my life.
    I would like to thank you for all you do. I wanted to let you know that your Cancer Diet Guide was very helpful and was working in controlling the cancer. I hope that this information helps others in their fight against cancer.
    Thank you,
    Trixie

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Trixie,
      I am so sorry to hear about your Sasha.
      Thinking of you in this difficult time of departure,
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Bitta Waddell

    In the last webinar Dr. Dressler recommended to give MCP to my dog with anal gland carcinoma. My vet says, I should feed them on an empty stomac.The warning was especially not to give it with any other supplements because it would bind them up and inactivate them, but in the Cancer Survival Guide it is recommended to give MCP with food. My dog is on K-9-Immunity and Artemisin, so, yes, he is on other supplements. What am I doing now?

  • Albert Poncelet

    I read your dog cancer book, I have a 11 year old beagle with bladder cancer. After trying all the remedies that you have in your book the cancer is still growing very slightly (2mm in last month). The vet has him on Piroxican for the last 3 months. The onocolongist wants him to go on low level radiation. The dog is healthy and shows no symptoms of cancer other than 3 epistosides of blood in the urine in the last 3 months which only lasted a day. Should I go with the low level radiation or with piroxican and mitoxantrone? This was diagnosed 11 months ago. Thank you

  • Kellygirl

    Hi Dr. Dressler, I am using information from your Dog Cancer Survival Guide and Dog Cancer Diet, and am so grateful for your work! My 9 y.o. male Golden Retriever Bailey was diagnosed with osteosarcoma in late May, and had a right hind leg amputation in mid-June. I decided against chemotherapy and instead am working to build up his immune system. I am incorporating the use of artemisinin into his supplement plan, and we are on Day 3 of our first round of that. He is about 75 lbs, so I am giving him 700 mg a day for 5 days. Yesterday and today he acted weird, like he had something stuck in his mouth that he did not like. I find nothing out of the ordinary in his mouth. He is eating and breathing fine and not in any sort of distress, other than periodically trying to open his mouth and paw at it a little. Should I break up the the artemesinin into two doses a day? I have been giving the entire dose all at once, opening the capsules in some cottage cheese with some fish oil. He readily eats it, but I am wondering if breaking the dose up twice a day is preferred, or if the powder may have a terrible taste. I cannot find any indication about this in your book. I am monitoring him closely for any adverse reaction, and my vet is aware of Bailey’s diet and supplements and is actively working with me. Also, all antioxidants have been discontinued while on the round of artemisinin. I’d appreciate any clarification you can offer about the artemisinin. Thanks! Kelly

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Kelly girl,
      something is causing discomfort- please see your vet promptly.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • susan

    What are the ingredients in your Apoptogen? I cannot find a readable internet view of the list on the bottle.
    Thank you
    SUsan

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Susan,
      this link shows up clearly on my monitor, hopefully it works for you:
      http://apocaps.com/product-facts/
      Best,
      D

  • Sam

    How about referring to me as a dog owner as opposed to guardian. Guardian is what the Animal Right’s supporters are advocating.
    Thank you

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Sam,
      guardianship is not an animal rights/legal issue solely, and although that is what is being used as a term in discussions concerning animal rights, the word is used also in a variety of other ways that apply to relationships. It is in this spirit that the contrast is presented. Being a dog owner, in my mind at least, would include multiple ways of relating to the pet, and is a term that carries little distinction between the different ways of handling or acting within the relationship. Here is the definition of guardian that I have in mind when clarifying this discussion:
      guard·i·an/ˈgärdēən/Noun
      1. A defender, protector, or keeper.
      Best,
      D

  • Xena

    Dr. D:

    I have a question for you. My dog was diagnosed with stage V lymphoma and leukemia on February 28, 2011. On 3/10/11 she began the Wisconsin protocol for cancer treatment.
    She was not able to take doxirubricin in week 6, 9, or 12 because she has a heart murmur (slight one). The vet gave Rubymyacin (spelled wrong?) instead. After week 12 I hoped to only go for chemo maintenance once a month. However, within 2 weeks of the last treatment #12 (was giving her leukeran at home) her lumps grew back. So the vet gave her one pill of CEENU. Then 2 weeks later the lumps came back again. Even though he told me the next CEENU was going to be 3 weeks later. Today A blood test revealed her liver levels were elevated. 800 vs. the normal range of 200 for the liver. So he told me no more CEENU for a while. He decided to give her an IV of docirubricin today. He told me to go back in 3 weeks. Do you think her lumps will come back before 3 weeks? Will this med be bad for a dog with a heart murmur?
    Also, do you ever travel to clients or in the Chicagoland area? Xena

  • Tracy

    Hi
    My Bud is 13yrs 3mths, his breed is mixed and until last September never had a poorly day. He had always done a good Elvis impression – had a shaky leg now and again – but then a couple of lunchtimes when I walked him he would be sitting down involuntarily. I first thought it could be arthritis and we tried glucosamine for a week but it happened again (it was every two or three days).
    My vet did a glucose test and diagnosed hypoglycemia and an insulinoma.
    We went for an ultrasound and a thorough internal examination of the abdominal cavity, they could ‘see’ two small but very clearly defined lumps in the pancreas, We went for surgery and the lumps were removed. Bud recovered very quickly and we were hopeful but the biopsy said the lumps were normal old pancreatic tissue. We initially managed the ‘wobbles’ with feeding 3 small meals a day and a snack before bed, but soon had to go on steroids – 7.5mg a day to start, I was very slowly reducing the dose feeling good about our success in doing so when my vet said Bud had developed Cushings. His steroid dose is now 2.5mg a day (half morning half evening), his appetite is the same as ever – anything he can get his paws on, its ok we are managing his weight :)
    He still loves walking on the beach and can still out last his “sister” Royal on long walks. He is still very bouncy and full of life and I have just ordered your book from Amazon as I will not give in if there is the tinest thing I can do to continue his fun.
    If you have any specific suggestions in regards to the diagnosis/prognosis I would be very grateful to hear from you.

    Kind regards
    Tracy & Bud

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Tracy
      well, let’s do this. If after reading the book (which has more info than I can possible provide here), you have further questions, please let us know! Insulinoma is not a common cancer, but the general cancer topics in the book will be applicable and relevant to your Bud. Be in touch,
      Best
      D

  • KIMBER

    My border collie mix had a liposarcoma removed from his side at 7 years of age. A malignant tumor developed next to his anus at at about 13 years 2 months. At that point I took the route of giving him a good quality of life and taking the best care of him I could. I finally had to have him put down at 14 years and 5 days old, primarily because of advanced degenerative myolopathy.
    I am curious what part you think that the spot flea treatments play in the increase of canine cancer? I suspect them as a culprit. Please give your thoughts.

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Kimber,
      the carcinogenity of the topical products you speak of, although present, likely is not high risk in most dogs. To be completely clear however, there is some very low risk, but more seen with obese dogs or in dogs of other breeds….
      My two cents on this topic, I hope this helps
      D

  • Kathy K.

    Dr. D.
    Our 14 y/o border collie mix was diagnosed with adrenal carcinoma, approx 2 cm tumor, in January 2011. She had no symptoms but a cough. Carboplatin was very successful for 6 months. We noticed return of cough over the past 30 days. Ultrasound today shows slight progression of 1cm in her tumor so oncologist opined that she had reached diminishing return on carbo and recommended Palladia. Her lab work today remains excellent. Do you concur with Palladia? Any other recommendations? Thank you.

  • cathy l

    I just wanted to share some hope with canine lovers out there. My chow who is going to be 11 in Jan 2012 has cancer. She had to have her back leg amputated in March 2010. After amputation of leg she was cancer free. Later when the biopsy of hock area came back it was said she has histiocytic sarcoma. Ultrasound done organs all clean. Was put on CCNU for three months as precaution again in October 2010 ultrasound done all organs clean again. Then in June 2011 went in for xray and blood work for small growth removal and xrays showed tumor on lungs…not good. Did biopsy on lung growth was told sarcoma. Now treating with CCNU again. After 1 dose and then xray done after 3 weeks tumor shrunk down to 1/3 original size and smaller tumor on other lung almost invisible. So far no side effects and liver panel are coming back good. This is the 3rd treatment now and in Oct 2011 will do another xray to see tumors in lungs. So far my chow is doing excellent she is happy, active and eating well. So is totally normal except for the limp when she walks because of her amputation. So right now, she is a miracle for me and I pray she continues to be the spirited little rascal she always was. Have you had any experience with the drug CCNU (lomustine)

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Cathy,
      so glad to hear this good news!! CCNU is a common medication used in dog cancer….keep us posted!
      Best,
      D

  • Carol

    Dr. Dressler,
    I have read the information regarding the cancer diet. My dog has mast cell tumors. I’ve been feeding her a low/grain/carb kibble since she was a puppy, she is 11. I’ve been feeding her a combo of kibble and your cancer diet for the last month. I was wondering if I could use a crockpot on low to cook all the meat/veg/brown rice/oatmeal together. I would add the cottage cheese later.
    This is such an informative site. Thank you.

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Carol,
      crock pot sounds great!
      Best
      D

  • Kathleen

    Hi Dr. Dressler,

    First of all, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge!!!

    Our 90lb, 6 yr old girl Lucy (we were told at the shelter she is a Terrier mix, but in a dog encyclopedia she looks very much like Treeing Tennessee Brindle) has been diagnosed with lymphosarcoma.

    I am still waiting for some of the supplements to arrive (including digestive enzymes), but I wanted to ask – we are weaning Lucy from her crunchies to your Dog Cancer Diet, and I have noticed in her most recent feces that the brown rice seemed undigested (same out as when it went in). This never occurred before her chemo (first treatment last week).

    Do you have any suggestions?

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Kathleen,
      this can happen from time to time. Might switch to the rolled cut oats and start your enzymes asap. Also you can puree the food in a food processor before offering. I hope this helps
      D

  • Chris S

    Hi Dr. Dressler.
    We just bought the latest version of the Canine Cancer Handbook (We already had the original and it was very helpful while one of our other dogs was going through some different cancers) Currently one of our dogs has a meningioma. We brought him to our neurologist and had an MRI and CSF tap done, opted to put him on prednisone and treat with Traditional Chinese Medicine (Acupuncture, and chinese herbs). We are also using a soy based natural hydrocortisone to wean him down on the prednisone that seems to be working pretty well although not as strong but no side effects and we can adjust the dose. Our neurologist is encouraging us to use hydroxyurea. I have yet to find any case studies supporting the effectiveness of this and saw that you had a sentence in your new book mentioning that this has been effective in menengiomas. By any chance can you direct me to any case studies? I’m also curious about your thoughts on the gamma knife and menengiomas. Our guy is a very spry and agile dog and our goal is to provide him with the absolute best quality of life. Thanks!

  • Monte Hellman

    My dog is undergoing chemo for lymphoma, whilst following the advice in your book, and is doing very well so far. Just got this news re: fish oil blocking chemo:

    What do you think?

    Best,

    Monte Hellman

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Monte,
      well, thanks to the media, we have a major outflow of anti-fish oil information. The PIFA’s, when in test tubes and in mice, do have evidence (a single study just released) for interfering with chemo. However, there is still a large body of information out there that indicate benfits of the PUFA’s DHA and EPA. Additionally, our approach in conventional medicine is to not hang too much on rodent and test-tube studies, which has led to exclusion of a large variety of treatments that may be effective in dogs or humans. The argument is that more research is needed in these cases. And this dutch study was just that- mice and “test tubes”.
      Short story- more information is needed, as there is a lot of evidence which is published that DHA and EPA are beneficial. But we should take note and continue to monitor for new data. At this point it is not enough for me to stop recommending these PUFA’s, or even krill/fish oil for that matter.
      The truth is that we are in our infancy as to our understanding of these compounds in relation to cancer care.
      D

  • Kathy K.

    Dr. D.
    In follow up to my 9/8 inquiry, we did proceed with a 1 week trial of Palladia for our 14 y/o border collie’s adrena carcinoma and have had amazing results. Her cough is greatly diminished and ultrasound shows that all of the fluid that had started to collect in her abdomen and around her lung is gone! While I know that it is intended for mast cell cancer, it appears to have stopped the progression. Any idea how long we can expect Palladia to work? We will also get to a point of diminishing return like the carbo after 6 mos? Would appreciate your thoughts.

    • http://DogCancerBlog.com DemianDressler

      Dear Kathy
      I am so pleased to hear this good news!
      We don’t have studies on palladia and adrenal carcinoma to my knowledge, so I am sorry but we don’t have the data you need. We have to go by feel for this one.
      Best
      D

  • Lyn

    Hi Dr. Dressler,

    Our now almost 15 mos old female GSD was diagnosed with a stage 3 nasal fibrosarcoma in July of this year. Her name is Kikka. I brought her to yhe ER when she was having an episde of epistaxis, preceeded by violent sneezing. She had a CT, rhinoscopy, and biopsy. An abdominal ultrasound and 3 view chest films showed no metasasis. We proceeded with Cyber Knife radiation therapy which finished a bit over 2 weeks ago. Dr. Ettiger was in charge of her care there. I feel fortunate that we live so close to this technology, and to Dr. Ettinger. Her nasal discharge is gone, as is her night time snoring. She still has occasional stridors, usually coinciding with periods of excitement, as when I return home from work. Her energy level and appetite are excellent. There are currently no GI or GU issues. She started on metronomic therapy this past Saturday along with the addition of doxycycline. I have also started her on Apocaps….love your book!!
    She has been on fish oil supplement since she came to us a year ago. The Omega 6 to omega 3 ratio is apporpriate. She has also been on K-9 complete since she’s come home. It’s a powdered supplement with probiotics that was recommended by a dog trainer we used for our older male GSD. when he 1st came home. She has also been on a frozen raw diet along with occasional fresh giblets, chicken and T-bone steak.. I am in the process of changing her over to the cancer diet. What is the ratio of protien to oatmael/rice to vegetables??

    Thank you, Lyn

  • Karen

    We have a 9 yr old Golden that has been in remission for more than 5 years from Grade II Leiomyosarcoma of the liver with a prognosis of no more than 1 year to live. We had the football size tumor removed in May 2006 off his liver & chose to do NO chemotherapy, we chose to go with alternative medicine, chinese herbs, acupunture & now on Marin. We also took him off ALL carbohydrates, he has an all protein and vegetable diet and NO SHOTS OF ANY KIND EXCEPT RABIES. We are so blessed to still have him in our lives, he brings such complete joy to our myself & my husband & so thankful that we made this decision. I’ve been wanting to share this story in hopes it could possibly help someone else trying to make such a decision.

  • Tanya

    Dr. Dressler, I cannot thank you enough for your Dog Cancer Survival Book and for the diet. My 85-lb 5-year-old female dog has osteosarcoma. Well, she now weighs 75 lbs, since we had her hind leg with the tumor amputated. My question is about the digestive enzymes. She normally is a good eater, however, she appears to not like the texture of the food once the enzymes have been added and sat there for 30 minutes, as recommended. Since it is so important that she eats but also equally important that she gets the most nutrition from her food, I was wondering if there another way to give her the enzymes? Any comments will be much appreciated. Thank you.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Tanya,
      eating without enzymes is better than not eating with enzymes.
      A second option would be to use the Wobenzyme capsules or tablets and administer those directly,at the same time as the meal.
      I hope this helps
      D

  • Mary M.

    Dear Dr. Dressler,
    Our beloved Teeko, our 10.5-year-old Australian Shepherd (45 lbs. spayed), was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma 4 weeks ago today. She presented with pitting edema in her left rear leg and upon further exam was found on ultrasound to have abdominal bleeding with various mass lesions shown in her leg muscle mass, probably metastasized. We chose to not have a needle aspiration or biopsy due to the risk, and had a dog before that we had an amputation due to osteosarcoma and decided to not go thru that again. She was started immediately on Yunnan Baiyao and I have your book but no mention is made of it in your book, yet I find comments on various websites about keeping dogs on this on a 5-day on/off basis or so. The YB cleared up her edema & hemorrhaging w/in a week so we were thrilled!!

    We can definitely feel masses in her leg so I have today ordered the Apocaps and will start her on it tomorrow. My concern is the YB is an anti-inflammatory as you say the Apocaps is and to not give them too much of anti-inflammatory drugs. How much is too much? Right now we give her one YB capsule 2x/day with a bit of diarrhea but no other side effects. She also takes pancreatin pills for pancreatis with great results. Our vet said to keep her on the YB indefinitely as they have a hemophiliac dog who has been on it for 2 years with no ill effects.

    I see that we’re supposed to give the Apocaps on an empty stomach but with work schedules it’s difficult to do this except on weekends. Being on the Yunnan Baiyao, what dosage of the Apocaps should we give her? Should we alternate with the YB?

    Thank you for being there for us and our families and for sharing thru this blog, your book and website. It’s been a great inspiration to us during this difficult time.

    Sincerely,

    Mary M.

  • Chris

    Dear Dr. Dressler,
    My 5 year old miniature Schnauzer has been diagnosed to have orbital meningioma, she had the tumor and her left eye removed in the surgery. She also has progressive retinal atrophy a year ago so without the eye would have no impact on her. The pathological report came back indicating ‘dirty margin’ and the vets said they would not choose to operate again. As we live in HK, there is no radiation therapy for animals. My vet recommended an oral drug Hydroxyurea. Since there is nothing much I can do, I will also visit a vet practicing complementary medicine and I am interested in Apocaps but wonder if Apocaps will interfere with the drug.

    Sincerely, Chris

  • Dr. Robert Nixon

    Where can I buy the various meds doctor recommends OTHER than Amazon?

    This is my second request.

    Thanks

    • MauiMedia

      Aloha, Dr. Nixon,
      If you are referring to Apocaps, please contact the manufacturer, Functional Nutriments.

  • Ed Capps

    Can the Apocaps be used as a preventative supplement? I am already giving my dog supplements like curcumin, ubiquinol, and spirulina.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Ed,
      I use Apocaps in healthy dogs, but older dogs (usually over 7) at at doses lower than those on the bottle (around 1/4 to 1/2 the bottle dose).
      Don’t need additional curcumin on Apocaps, btw.
      Always discuss with your vet first…
      Best
      Dr D

  • Kathy

    Hello, Dr. Dressler — Unfortunately, courtesy of my 2 FS Std Poodles (unrelated) I’ve had the opportunity to do a “crash course” in canine oncology this year. Am now reading your book and waiting on delivery of APOCAPS.
    1) to emphasize your “Not all soft lumps are lipomas!” point: Dolly had a lump on her back which was “felt” by several Vets over 3-4 years; it had a fine-needle aspirate; and, finally, when it erupted in May, a slide histology.
    All of those exams and tests said “not cancer.” When it didn’t respond to antibiotics, I took over and found a
    Board-certified oncologist and had it removed. Much to our chagrin, it turned out to be an extremely rare tumor “malignant trichoepithelioma” — which, had it been removed sooner might have been “cured” by surgery. As it is,
    the prognosis is “guarded” because it appears that some communication has been established between the tumor and the lymph nodes. Since it’s rare, there is no “normal” prescribed protocol — only the possibility that
    metronomic dosing of piroxicam and cytoxin would hold it at bay. (We aren’t doing that — yet, anyway.)
    2) related to your Thanksgiving message — We spent Thanksgiving on pins-and-needles waiting for the Pathology report on a splenic mass which had developed/surfaced in Gracie the weekend before T-day and
    which was removed that Monday. The presumptive diagnosis based on ultrasound by Board-certified Oncologist was splenic hemangiosarcoma — with grim prospects. However, that bullet missed Gracie (2/3 aren’t so lucky).
    She still has a few other lumps and bumps which were examined by the Oncologist in June — and are (hopefully)
    just “normal old dog things.”

    Reading some of the earlier posts — probably with a dose of paranoia — I’m now concerned about yet another
    “soft squishy bump” which has recently appeared on Dolly’s belly. While we were at the Oncologists for Gracie, she just got re-checked for metastasis of the malignant trichoepithelioma to lungs and sentinel lymphs — and looked clean. Guess there’s nothing to say she couldn’t have developed hemangiosarcoma, too.

    Since the “malignant trichoepithelioma” is rare, it doesn’t make your lists of “common” cancers. Any ideas ?

    Thanks.

    Kathy for Dolly & Gracie

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Kathy
      I am sorry to hear of your recent foray into veterinary cancer medicine :(
      As to your question, it would always be most prudent to get the soft lump aspirated…better safe than sorry!
      Best
      Dr D

  • Terri Lohman

    My Golden has Lymphoma and is on Apocaps and K-9 immunity. His white cell count kept going up. He wouldn’t act sick or run a fever. We would put him on antibiotics and his neutrophil count would come down. I lowered his K-9 immunity to 2 caps twice a day and he has been stable for two weeks now. I’m wondering if the K-9 immunity can over stimulate the immune system in some dogs. He is 95 pounds.

  • Jennifer Heim

    My ten yr old Maltese “Sassy” had surgery in Oct 11 for a stage 3 mast cell tumor on her back close to the spine and attached to a couple of ribs. They couldn’t get it all due to the proximity to the spine and they said the prognosis was very poor due to the fast growing nature of the cells. They offered a second surgery to remove a couple of ribs, I said no, they referred me to an oncologist. I love my dog, but I don’t have $7000. She has been on your diet since her stitches came out, with Apocaps, K-9 immunity, K-9 transfer, digestive enzymes, coconut oil, benedryl,excercise, and a lot of love. I honestly thought she would be gone by now from what I was told, but she has more energy, appetite and playfulness than she’s had in years. I don’t know when her time will come, but for now her quality of life is great and I feel it’s due to the diet and supplements. I will keep her on this regime until that time comes. Thank you for book and information. I have two other Maltese, a Yorkie, and a chihuahua, I don’t have them on the cancer diet as you said it’s not appropriate for normal dogs, but I’ve made modifications for them to eat healthier and maybe I can avoid the scourge of cancer again.

  • Jeannette Botza

    How much longer does metronomic therapy extend a dogs life. Are the drugs
    used for this therapy toxic?

  • Cathy

    Hi there Dr. Dressler,
    First I want to say thank you for your help and time by offering this help source. Susan has been a Huge help and very nice, too. I appreciate this avenue more than you know.
    I’ll try to make this brief as I’m sure you are loaded with questions.
    My dog was diagnosed with Lymphoma in January. I immediately read your book and put her on the diet. Slowly adding things for smooth introduction. Normally she’s got a hardy stomach so it was no problem. She’s experienced on/off diarrhea recently which Oncologist and I are trying to figure out if diet or chemo. Poop Perfect for 2wks then out of the blue 3rd week loose.
    The treatment she is receiving is CCNU/Elspar which apparently has very mininal effects.
    1st treatment ~ no side effects,
    2nd black stool 3 days later,
    3rd ~ nausea put in check with meds and
    4th treatment no side effect but didn’t do Elspar.
    Dr wants to change treatment up
    She was due for her 5th treatment if 4th treatment kept her bowels in check for the 3wks. Welp, we were good for 2, again. So we held off for a week for bowels to normalize. Had a normal stool that day and ever since then a straight week of diarrhea. I have dumbed down her diet to chicken rice cottage cheese and pumpkin for firm her up, and maybe 3 calcium pills, ( now just chicken/rice/cottage chs ~afraid not enough vitamins etc) but no luck. She did eat a bunch of very hardy grass that day and hasn’t been the same since..and I think I gave more pumpkin than I was supposed to, but a week of complete diarrhea? Pumpkin in color makes me think that’s the culprit. Sorry for the TMI.
    Was suggested I do an ultrasound to check if lymphoma returned in abdomen causing this upset although has responded well in her opinion to the treatments.
    My problem now is….she is completely bored with the diet. Not uncommon for her as she’s done this in her past. I tried wet Halo and it really upset her. I think she misses crunchy too. After learning how crunchy is made I’m really hesitant to do that, but a girl has to eat I guess. Dr suggested I do Royal Canine Gastrointensinal or Allergenic. Both bland and I KNOW she’ll refuse it and I can’t entice her with our cancer diet. Now what do I do? I really want to get her stomach in check so I can start the Apocaps I’ve had waiting for her.
    Does this sound like a diet issue or a chemo issue. I’m not asking for a diagnosis over the computer, I understand that’s not realistic, just meaning from the sounds of her road these past few months.
    Any input you have would be greatly appreciated!! What can I feed her that will satisfy all the nutrients/ minerals/ vitamins and stay cancer specific.
    Ky & I thank you again for your time.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Cathy
      One idea would be to assess whether or not there is dysbiosis of the inestine (bacterial imbalance/clostridial overgrowth) as a result of the dietary changes. I would check with your vet on this. If so some metronidazole followed by probiotics will clear it up nicely.
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • Bert Heidolf

    Hi Dr Dressler,I was wondering how much Calcium Citrate I can give my dog Maggie,she had her left leg including her hip removed (Osteosarcoma) I was not able to get the brand you use,this one is by Webber Naturals with vitamin D3 .300 mg of calcium citrate. 5mcg(200 ui) of vitamin D3. Xrays were taken and we are praying that we caught this in time. Have your book Dog Cancer survival guide it has been really helpfull,and using the cancer diet for her and her brother Billy.( A friend had their brother wich passed away from Lymphoma.)Maggie is 68lbs mixed breed looks like border collie ,shepherd etc. Thankyou looking forward to hearing back. Bert

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Bert,
      It is tough for me to answer this without knowing your dog’s diet. If your dog is on a commercial diet…different from a dog cancer diet?
      D

  • Bert Heidolf

    Hi Dr. Dressler, Thank you for getting back to me.My dog Maggie is on your cancer diet..she gets one cup in the morning and one and a half at supper.The calcium Citrate is by Webber Naturals 300mg. of Calcium Citrate with 5mcg(200ui) of vitamin D3. She is 68lbs.I use lean ground beef and the ingredients in your base mixture. Just not sure how much calcium citrate to put in.I was also wondering if the treats I make are ok to give her the ingredients is 1cup whole wheat flour,one half cup rolled oats ,one half cup water ,1 egg,3Tbsp olive oil and 2Tbsp Molasses( Baked at 350′ 15 min.)I haven’t given her any since her leg was removed(osteosarcoma). The xrays showed it was just in and around the knee area,so as I mentioned before we are praying that it was caught in time. Thank you again,your cancer book has been a blessing,wonderful information and has helped me alot. Bert Ps.She is allergic to chicken.

  • Dr. Demian Dressler

    From our Facebook site:
    “My 15 year old little husky has been diagnosed with spindle cell sarcoma tumor on her neck region near or under her jaw last week after an aspiration by our vet. Its Second re-occurence after surgery last May. Now to she is old for surgery and I am not doing chemo. I wanted to know if anyone has had experience with this sort of cancer/tumor. Also i f anyone has used artemesinin or artemix and if its helped their dogs with reducing tumor. I dont want to give her extra stuff if its not worth it. She means the world to me and I want to do all I can to help her. She has also been on K9 Immunity Plus for 2 years todate, DHA fish oil, transfer factor also has a good healthy home prepared diet. I have also recently added over the last year greenlipped mussel/synflex glucosamine to her diet and lots of good fish treats with good omegas. I stay away from commercially made supermarket petfood. I just want to know what others think and have done. Any help would be great.”
    These are tough tumors. If we are not going to pursue radiation, please discuss with your vet:
    1. Apocaps
    2. Neoplasene both oral and topical
    3. Intralesional cisplatin impregnated beads (Matrix 3)
    Be sure to use the dog cancer diet in the Guide or on the top of this site (free download). These topics are also discussed in the Guide and on this site as well.
    I hope this helps
    Dr D

  • deborah calvert

    Can you tell me when to neuter a large breed rott/shep. told if done too early can cause stunted growth plates and can cause bone Ca?

  • Monica Russell

    Dear Dr. D:

    I bought your book, and I quickly read through it – but my vet has talked to me about using cryosurgery to remove a mast cell tumor on my boston terrier’s ear. You didn’t write anything about this option in your book – and I was wondering if you could provide some more insight into this option. My dog’s tumor only measures .5 cm, and the vet said that is why this is an option. The vet said its a lot less invasive – and that she has had great success with this option. I am just worried that if they don’t get the whole thing it will come back. Would you try cryosurgery first – or would you just opt to remove his ear?

    Any help you can provide would be greatly appreciated.
    Monica Russell

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Monica
      cryo is just freezing tissue. It has disadvantages if the biopsy is not done first, as it destroys the ability of the pathologist to grade the tumor which is very important in determining the best course of action.
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/dog-cancer-words-you-should-know-grade-and-stage/
      I’m okay with cryo as long as
      1. the grade is obtained
      2. the margins are appropriate
      I hope this helps
      D

  • Lauren Spalding

    Dear Dr Dressler and Dr. Ettinger. Fristly i’d like to say I have just read your 2nd edition book which was very insightful. My dog Ellie a Kelpie Koolie cross was diagnosed with Multicentric B Cell Lymphoma (at least IIIb possiby IVb stage) back in April 2010. She was 7 years of age at the time. We put her on the modified Madison Wisconsin protocol. The first remission lasting 12 months. She then came out of remission. The vet advised us to use the same protocol again to treat her and was in remission for a further 14 months. I have been back to my vet/oncologist today as One lymph node under her jaw was enlarged. An aspirate has been done and has confirmed the worst – Lymphoma. I want to proceed with a 3rd round and my vet has recommended the same protocol. I would love to know your thoughts on this or should we change to a different drug Protocol? My vet is looking into the Aptocaps as I would like to introduce these to her treatment along with K9 Immunity and anything else you might suggest. I would welcome any information you could share with me.Ellie is due to start Chemo on Thursday 14th (tomorrow) if you could share any information with us before then we would very grateful. I am quite concerned. Do you know of any cases where a dog has had chemo 3 times for lymphoma and success rates, or any dogs that have been cured? Many Thanks. Lauren and Ellie

  • Billie O’Connor

    My five year old Sheltie has been diagnosed by MRI with a meningioma after seizuring 2 weeks ago. I’ve been told by more than one specialist that surgery is risky and he is about to start radiation. He is on phenobarb and Keppra for the sezuires as well as prednisolone. The book says glutamine is contraindicated in brain tumors. I notice glutamine is an ingredient in apocaps. Is apocaps ok in this case?

  • Katrina

    Hi Dr. Dressler,

    My 7 year-old Standard Poodle was recently diagnosed with stage IV, T-cell Lymphoma. I’ve purchased your book, just ordered some Apocaps, and have had him on a cancer diet since he’s been willing to eat again. He won’t be getting chemo or radiation therapy, but is taking prednisolone.

    I’m curious about the issue of omega-6 fatty acids. In the book, you suggest limiting omega-6, which I understand. However, you also suggest the use of coconut oil with meals. Although I’m aware that lauric acid can be quite beneficial, can you address why the level of omega-6 in coconut oil isn’t cause for concern?

    Thanks so much for your time.

  • Ed Capps

    Dr Dressler,

    I was wondering about your opinion on stem cell transplants for Lymphoma that some such as Dr. Suter at North Carolina State vet school are starting to do. It seems very much like the transplants done for humans for some time, and I believe is actually so far achieving a 30% CURE rate as opposed to the virtually 0% cure rate with the traditional therapies.

    • Dr. Susan Ettinger

      Hi Ed,
      I thought I would chime in on this because Dr Suter is a colleague of mine and I am quite familiar with his work. For the right dog and Guardian this is a very exciting treatment option for lymphoma. The goal is to cure lymphoma so dogs do not need chemotherapy after treatment. But to achieve this, they start with chemo to get in remission and then go through a rigorous treatment of high dose chemo, stem cell transplants, and total body radiation at NC State. Most dogs are hospitalized for 2 to 3 weeks and there is greater cost and side effects than traditional chemo. But it is a good option. If you are interested, have your oncologist or vet contact him directly. Thanks for the question, and good luck!
      Dr Sue

    • Dr. Demian Dressler
  • robert lahser

    Hello- I just now ordered the Dog Cancer Survival Guide. Our 11-year-old Rat Terrier Murphy has a recurring Mast Cell tumor that was cut out 7/12/12 we are currently waiting for the pathology report ,should I STOP feeding Nordic Naturals pet fish oil ? since it may have histamine and should I stop feeding low fat cottage cheese (high in Lysine)?
    thanks,
    Robert

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Robert,
      With the mast cells at least mainly removed (hopefully a metastasis check was done..) I would be okay with the fish oil. If there are still a lot of histamine secreting mast cells in the body though I’d drop it and change to krill oil. Wouldn’t worry about the cheese unless there is allergy to it.
      Best
      Dr D

  • http://www.goldenpawspcs.com Victoria

    Dr. D and Dr. E,

    Could you do a write up on Cryosurgery? It was offered as an option for my 10 yr old labradane who was diagnosed with oral melanoma. I have been having a hard time finding information on it’s effectiveness, compared to traditional surgery (mandibulectomy for Mitzi’s case) and woudl love your input on it!

    Thanks!
    Victoria K.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Victoria,
      its just freezing tissue off instead of cutting it off, radiating it off, lasing it off, etc. I don’t feel it is particularly special as a cancer treatment per se. It is nice as there can be less pain and its less invasive but it is not more effective in my opinion
      Dr D

  • Debbie Elliott

    I think I wrote on the wrong blog….our 11 year old shep collie mix had a splenectomy 4 weeks ago – small hemangiosarcoma had been discovered while looking for something else. No evident metastisis.. We have decided to do low dose pill, no Big Gun Red, in light of his anxiety at the vets, and his age. He has been eating Evolution vegan food with mostly veggie scraps for 7 years. He is also looking like Cushings – his appetite, always healthy, is in overdrive…I’m giving him oatmeal and tumeric, plus more veggies and Evolution. Animal protein appears to be carcinogenic in people, so would appreciate diet pointers, and would apopcap (??) be appropriate? THANKS!

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Debbie
      sorry to hear about your dog. Btw, you can post comments on any page on the blog.
      First read this:
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/an-overview-of-what-else-can-i-do/
      Yes apocaps under veterinary supervision would be appropriate, among other things! Get the info tho. There’s some fine tuning that is needed. Drop the turmeric for apocaps. fix the diet (protein per say is not carcinogenic, it is prot that is cooked above certain temps…download the diet pdf on top of the blog and please read!)
      Best,
      Dr D

  • robert lahser

    PLEASE RESPOND:
    My 11-year-old Rat Terrier Murphy has a recurring Mast cell tumor that was recently excised it was grade II,pathology came back as miotic level 0-1/10hpf no signs of metastasis. I’m feeding raw food Steve’s Real Raw Food Turkey Benadryl, Tagamet Vit. C low fat cottage cheese 2x’s daily and Nordic Natrurals Pet Cod Liver Oil,probiotics. Please tell me if I should stop adding fish oil to my dogs diet,I can’t find any information that high quality fish oil contains histamine or not,I DON”T want to add any histamine to our dog,Murphy’s diet.
    Thanks,
    Robert

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Robert,
      the problem only exists when there are tons of mast cells left in the dog or there was no surgery. You can use krill oil instead. This is a low proirity issue for your dog based on what I believe to be the case (not having hands on the dog I am not sure though).
      There are other items to think about
      I would not be doing cod liver oil btw- over time you may see certain vitamin toxicities depending on the doses you are using. Raw diet is debatable:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aitN0v9Uu4A&feature=plcp
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • Katie

    I would disagree with regards to the crucerferous vegs and a diet rich in them. The reason is These types of vegs are not only hard to digest but dogs dont have amalayse to help break them down until it gets to the small intestine. With that in mind there isnt a whole lot of it in the small intestine so I question how much plant matter dogs should really have in there diet when youlook at there ansesters. There is one other issue we see as well. The crucerfus vegs cause thyroid supression if eaten daily. In the practice I work at we are seeing this allot with dogs that eat this tyoe of vegs daily. We especiall see this in raw fed dogs because most of the commerically prepard diets have them in it. We love raw food but to much of a good thing can cause other things to fall apart. If you think of the early 1900′s when we didnt have refrigeration we ate only what we could grow and store without spoiliage. So those types of vegs were not plentifull like they are today. We typicall only ate them in the fall when they are grown. HTMA paterns can show us this before it becomes a disease it shows whow the pitituary adrenala nd thyroid are functioning. It does take time for this to become clinical so wouldnt you rather know before there is supression of the thyroid before it become a disease so you can correct it when you can? Unfortunatly most vets do not understand what this all means or believe in it. I have found this tool to be very helpfull in the treatment of many diseases. The interesting thing I find is that raw fed dogs that have cancer do not want to eat any carbohydrates. Maybe because certain types of carbs can feed the cancers becuase of the hight glycemic index they have. My own dog was treated with chinese medicine angiostop and revivin as well as a few other supplements and always had a hair test ev 3 months to moniter his progress to see what was still stored in the body in the form of excess mineral or defficiencies as well as heavy metals.The goal is to get the dogs into balance so the body can function optimally to fight this dreded disease. Blood work was also done not as often since it typically didnt say a whole lot about his cancer which was mast cell sarcoma. He is 3.5 yrs out without any side effects and so far no more cancer either. He continues to do very well without the drugs:) or cancer. Just my 2 cents. K

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Katie
      thanks for your input.
      A couple of items to bring to your attention:
      1. Sulphorane and IP3 are not carbs and do not require amylase specifically
      2. note I did not say a diet “rich” in cruciferous veggies- if you read the diet you will see there are controlled amounts as opposed to a diet “rich” in them
      3. the dog cancer diet includes diegestive enzymes, low temp cooking, and pureeing of veggies to aid in assimilation
      4. the dog cancer diet addresses the issue of veggie intake in dogs (nutrients from prey species are originally from plants)
      So they are good points and I would suggest further reading- thanks!
      Dr D

  • Debbie

    Dr. Dressler I purchased the Dog Cancer survival guide for my dog Tyler who had Hemangiosarcoma. The book was very helpful and gave some great information. However, he lost his battle Sunday night and is resting peacefully. My question is you talk about a dog food for dogs with cancer, but do you recommend one for dogs without cancer. I have a German Shepherd and would like to keep her as healthy as possible, I can’t imagine going through this again. Thanks!

  • http://www.mydogcatering.com Lisa Makrinikolas

    Hello Dr. Dressler. I’ve been down the cancer road many times before and am now facing it (I fear) with my oldest pug. He turned 14 in April and has some other health issues that require Phenobarbital and Anipryl on a daily basis. He is on a grain-free diet from Honest Kitchen and supplements with Sam-e, CocoTherapy and Honest Kitchen’s Quiet Tea (valerian that helps him and us sleep through the night).

    Of course you can’t make specific recommendations for a dog you’ve never examined, but I’m wondering if anything in the Apocaps would be contra-indicated with the Pheno or Anipryl? We may have to start steroid therapy as his health is fragile and surgery to remove more of the mass (mast cell tumor on paw) is not feasible and I will not put him through chemo/radiation.

    We adopted him when he was 8 and he’s been on high-quality diet and supplements since then, which is probably why even at 14 with his health issues (brain tumor, alzheimer’s, blind, deaf) he lives a pretty happy life and isn’t ready to go anywhere just yet :) I won’t hesitate to start the Apocaps just want to make sure it won’t interfere with anything else.

    Thanks much in advance,

    Lisa and Vince

  • Joel Zoldessy, MD

    Dr. Dressler,
    Permit me to make a suggestion as regards your excellent EverPup supplement that I have been purchasing for our Goldendoodle.
    At the required two scoops per day, any given jar lasts but 2 weeks, requiring frequent re-orders. Please vend a jar containing sufficient product for a full month.

  • Debbie

    I wasn’t sure where to post this, but I have an extra pack of Yunnan. My dog Tyler was taking it for his Hemangiosarcoma, he passed on Sunday and I would like to be able to help someone else out (no charge).

  • Trish Makro

    Just wondering if it is okay to give freeze dried chicken necks to dogs with cancer? I’m not sure if they have preservatives or anything else added to them.

  • tony heiman clovis n.mex.

    my 10 yr old chihuahua had xrays taken and 3 spots were found and she gaggs and chokes all the time and sleeps alot…what can i do to help her?? I have no $ to take her to the vet…tony

  • Laura

    Dr. D

    I came across your site for your Apocaps while I was searching for help and hope after my whole family and our 10yr old German Shorthair heard the diagnose of transitional cell carcinoma. You see, not one vet that I took her to even considered doing a biopsy to confirm this, yet they just referred back to the text books and actually told us that this is the most common form of cancer among spayed female dogs.. Not even those at Cornell University Animal Hospital in New York State came up with anything else to say, other than putting her down. I prayed for one last hope. She was a rescue dog and we have had her now for four years. And with rescue dogs, you’re not privy to what has truly gone on with their health. I only new that she was on prednisone for most of her life for allergies and if she was to be off it, she would have severe UTI’s. I thought this to be strange, but with the advice of my vet at that time, she was weened off the prednisone and never had a UTI. However, the newest vet that I have found has mentioned to me numerous times that she can not settle with the previous dx and feels something is missing. With her diligent work, we found a surgeon who re-examined my baby and confirmed that the mass everyone was feeling and diagnosing as cancer just was not in the usual place. So he was very confident that the mass could be removed and my dog can go back to peeing normally as she did before. Well, surgery was performed, the mass was not removed because it was at the base of her urethra and the size of a marble. He was able though to take several well needle aspirations to send onto the lab. We were now told to brace ourselves for what type of cancer this is. When the results came back, there was no stating of it being “inconclusive” nor did it state “cancer”, what it did state is “inflammation.” Now we were given the dx of granulomatous urethritis. I know this is an autoimmunity and I know you specialize in cancer, however, my question to you is this. In order for my dog to strive, her immune system must be fit and it is not. It is being taxied with prednisone and Imuran daily (well for at least now). Will your Apocaps help to strengthen her immune system or are these pills strictly helpful with those who have cancer. Thank you in advance.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Laura,
      there are some compounds in Apocaps that assist with both inflammation (luteolin, curcumin, apigenin, etc) and also with immune dysfunction (beta glucans). I would run it by the vets though to be sure they are in agreement.
      Best
      Dr D

  • Jaeme

    I have found this an incomparable resource as I deal with a mast cell tumour.

    I apologize–if this has been addressed, I cannot search it correctly; Do you have any sort of review or insight into the newly available (here at least!) FreshPet food? At first glance it seems to have the right ingredients, cooked at low temp…

  • Melissa

    Hi Drs. Dressler,

    I have been reading about the benefits of goat milk and goat cheese and just wondered if goat by-products are contraindicated for dogs with cancer or whether it is okay for me to give my dog some. I am trying to find ways to help him gain and maintain his weight.

    Thanks,

    Melissa

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Melissa,
      I’m wondering about the need for goat’s milk products in your dog…can you send the links and I would be happy to check it out.
      D

  • Laura

    Dr. Dressler,

    First off, thank you for your informative site and book. Cancer is a horrible disease and I appreciate that there are individuals such as yourself whom have devoted extensive time and energy working to help dogs with this disease.

    I have just purchased your book and apocaps and plan to begin them as soon as they arrive.

    Please review below and I look forward to your thoughts.

    ISSUE: I have a Weimariner (Vega) who is 8 1/2 that has recently been diagnosed with Grade 2 Mast cell. He has been lumpy all his life and has had benign tumors removed and/or tested many times. We have always supplemented his with fish oil, and sometime barley grass, turmeric, milk thistle and astragulus. Unfortunately his bumps were getting more prevalent so I took him to a holistic vet and we decided to have 7 of the lumps removed and 4 sent off for biopsy. 2 came back benign, 1 (on his trunk) a grade 2 clean margins and the other they weren’t able to tell so are going to do some further research. I will be meeting with our vet for a consult about next steps and when I do this I will find out what the score of the mast cell is according to your recommendation (1-10).

    He still has about 13 lumps that I think we are going to have removed. Most are the size of a pea or smaller, 2 are nickel size. He has had these ongoing for about 1 1/2 years and they come and go. Some are newer, but all similar in appearance. We had several aspirated 1 1/2 yrs ago and they proved benign.

    Unfortunately we are not new to the mast cell sufferers. We lost our sharpei 5 years ago to a grade 3 tumor that popped up and got nasty quickly. He was given three weeks to live. We went to a cancer specialist and he made it 9 great months with chemo and I supplemented him with medicinal mushrooms from new chapter. With our cancer vet we also tried cryo freezing and he had open wounds that we had to treat 2 x a day. We know the dedication it takes for sick animal and are willing to put forth the effort to make Vega better.

    I hate cancer and do not want to loose another pet to it, so I am taking the time to do this properly and would greatly appreciate your help and input.

    CURRENT DIET: I put or dogs on the raw diet and used to supplement with Honest Kitchens new chapter, but haven’t done that in several years. I hate this disease and specifically feed our dogs human grade ground beef and supplement because I never wanted to have another dog with cancer.. In the meantime I am giving CAS options from genesis resources, astragulus, turmeric, medicinal mushrooms, and spirugreen (superfood for pets from Dr. Mercola).

    PLAN OF ACTION: I’m ordering your book today and will read it and take into account your advice. I have done extensive research over the past few weeks on dog cancer and I have a protocol that I think we would like to try with Vega and would greatly appreciate your comments-

    PROPOSED DIET: I will follow your dog cancer diet, but would like to do raw (ground beef) and supplement with either Embark, honest Kitchen (or similar).We are very busy so I want to feed him great, but don’t have a lot of time to prepare foods. Are you familiar with these? If not, what do you recommend? I understand chicken may not be the best for mast cell. How do you feel about ground beef?

    PROPOSED PLAN:

    The vet wanted to originally treat with oral and injectable neoplasne, but since many of the tumors seem to be benign and they are clumped throughout his torso and hips she thinks just oral may be the way to go. She has worked with Buck mountain before and as of last night was going to call them to see what they recommend. I will be having a consult with her in the coming days to discuss further.

    - Apocaps based on your directions

    - Neoplasene Oral

    - Budwig diet- I understand cottage cheese and dairy may not be appropriate food for dogs with mast cell, but have faith in this protocol and wanted to know what you recommend instead of cottage cheese? Or is cottage cheese acceptable?

    - Benadryl- I’ve read that long term use of benadryl can damage the organs. What are your thoughts?

    -Medicinal mushroom blend from New Chapter. I’m aware that with yours and Buck mountain’s protocols it is best to not supplement with many antioxidants because it can be counter productive. Will these mushrooms counteract the pro-oxodiants?

    -Spirugreen. This is a supplement that contains spirulina and astaxanthin from Dr mercola.

    -Probiotics

    -Dog digestive enzymes from dr. mercola

    - Other mast cell drugs- I have read about some of these and want to know what you think about these?

    -Chemo. I would prefer not to go this route unless absolutely necessary. It is very costly and Vega hates the vet so I don’t want to subject him to this more than I have to.

    -Anything I am missing?

    Vega is very happy and healthy currently and I want to do whatever we can to keep him this way as long as we can and hopefully even eliminate his cancer. I have faith in a lot of the natural alternatives and hope we will be successful.

    Thank you so very much for you help and what you are doing for our beloved animals.

    -L

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Laura
      sorry to hear all of this. see below:
      r. Dressler,

      First off, thank you for your informative site and book. Cancer is a horrible disease and I appreciate that there are individuals such as yourself whom have devoted extensive time and energy working to help dogs with this disease.
      welcome

      I have just purchased your book and apocaps and plan to begin them as soon as they arrive.
      good

      Please review below and I look forward to your thoughts.

      ISSUE: I have a Weimariner (Vega) who is 8 1/2 that has recently been diagnosed with Grade 2 Mast cell. He has been lumpy all his life and has had benign tumors removed and/or tested many times. We have always supplemented his with fish oil, and sometime barley grass, turmeric, milk thistle and astragulus. Unfortunately his bumps were getting more prevalent so I took him to a holistic vet and we decided to have 7 of the lumps removed and 4 sent off for biopsy. 2 came back benign, 1 (on his trunk) a grade 2 clean margins and the other they weren’t able to tell so are going to do some further research. I will be meeting with our vet for a consult about next steps and when I do this I will find out what the score of the mast cell is according to your recommendation (1-10).
      grade

      He still has about 13 lumps that I think we are going to have removed. Most are the size of a pea or smaller, 2 are nickel size. He has had these ongoing for about 1 1/2 years and they come and go. Some are newer, but all similar in appearance. We had several aspirated 1 1/2 yrs ago and they proved benign.

      Unfortunately we are not new to the mast cell sufferers. We lost our sharpei 5 years ago to a grade 3 tumor that popped up and got nasty quickly. He was given three weeks to live. We went to a cancer specialist and he made it 9 great months with chemo and I supplemented him with medicinal mushrooms from new chapter. With our cancer vet we also tried cryo freezing and he had open wounds that we had to treat 2 x a day. We know the dedication it takes for sick animal and are willing to put forth the effort to make Vega better.

      I hate cancer and do not want to loose another pet to it, so I am taking the time to do this properly and would greatly appreciate your help and input.

      CURRENT DIET: I put or dogs on the raw diet and used to supplement with Honest Kitchens new chapter, but haven’t done that in several years. I hate this disease and specifically feed our dogs human grade ground beef and supplement because I never wanted to have another dog with cancer.. In the meantime I am giving CAS options from genesis resources, astragulus, turmeric, medicinal mushrooms, and spirugreen (superfood for pets from Dr. Mercola).

      PLAN OF ACTION: I’m ordering your book today and will read it and take into account your advice. I have done extensive research over the past few weeks on dog cancer and I have a protocol that I think we would like to try with Vega and would greatly appreciate your comments-

      PROPOSED DIET: I will follow your dog cancer diet, but would like to do raw (ground beef) and supplement with either Embark, honest Kitchen (or similar).We are very busy so I want to feed him great, but don’t have a lot of time to prepare foods. Are you familiar with these? If not, what do you recommend? I understand chicken may not be the best for mast cell. How do you feel about ground beef?

      not raw ground beef
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/more-raw-ideas-on-dog-cancer/

      those commercial diets are ok- usually do half home made dog cancer diet under these circumstances

      PROPOSED PLAN:

      The vet wanted to originally treat with oral and injectable neoplasne, but since many of the tumors seem to be benign and they are clumped throughout his torso and hips she thinks just oral may be the way to go. She has worked with Buck mountain before and as of last night was going to call them to see what they recommend. I will be having a consult with her in the coming days to discuss further.

      ok

      - Apocaps based on your directions

      might try apocaps before oral neoplasine for 1-2 weeks. measure tumor diameter/take photos so you know what is going on over time

      - Neoplasene Oral

      ok

      - Budwig diet- I understand cottage cheese and dairy may not be appropriate food for dogs with mast cell, but have faith in this protocol and wanted to know what you recommend instead of cottage cheese? Or is cottage cheese acceptable?

      dog cancer diet is better

      - Benadryl- I’ve read that long term use of benadryl can damage the organs. What are your thoughts?

      not true usually. ok to use if too much histamine.

      -Medicinal mushroom blend from New Chapter. I’m aware that with yours and Buck mountain’s protocols it is best to not supplement with many antioxidants because it can be counter productive. Will these mushrooms counteract the pro-oxodiants?

      yes. but youll read i use these compounds (with their antiox effects) because the beneficial effects outweigh the interfering effects

      -Spirugreen. This is a supplement that contains spirulina and astaxanthin from Dr mercola.

      low priority…antioxidant…not now..ok for remission phase if you can get it

      -Probiotics

      fine

      -Dog digestive enzymes from dr. mercola

      fine

      - Other mast cell drugs- I have read about some of these and want to know what you think about these?

      tallk to oncologist, id consider them with this much mast cell tumor. i lean toward kinavet over palladia personally if we are talking oral protocols

      not sure which drugs we are discussing..

      -Chemo. I would prefer not to go this route unless absolutely necessary. It is very costly and Vega hates the vet so I don’t want to subject him to this more than I have to.

      ok..but consider carefully..
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/what-is-treatment-plan-analysis/

      -Anything I am missing?

      krill oil
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/help-overcome-dog-food-dangers-krill-oil-versus-fish-oil/

      Vega is very happy and healthy currently and I want to do whatever we can to keep him this way as long as we can and hopefully even eliminate his cancer. I have faith in a lot of the natural alternatives and hope we will be successful.

      maybe wobenzyme instead of mercolas

      mind body which you will read about

      also sleep which you will read about

      also timing of treatments (difficult to get all the data we need as we just don’t know but anyway):
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/thhe-right-time-for-chemotherapy-drugs-for-dog-cancer/

      Thank you so very much for you help and what you are doing for our beloved animals.

      yep

      -L

  • http://www.arthrem.co.nz Amanda Clark

    Hi Dr. Dressler !

    I have come across your work while conducting research for a NZ-based dietary supplement company working with supercritically-extracted (CO2) artemisinin.

    We are currently conducting a clinical trial of a canine version of our artemisinin-based arthritis treatment, ‘arthRem’ and would love to have a conversation about any known veterinary drug interactions etc that you may be aware of, from your research to date in other disease conditions.

    Would it be possible to arrange a telephone consultation, perhaps ?

    Best regards,
    Amanda Clark

  • Laura

    Dr. Dressler,

    Thank you very much for your comments! I know my comments contained quite a bit of info and I greatly appreciate your time:).

    I’ve read you book now and am heeding your great advice. I’m making time to cook for Vega on the weekends because I think it is better than the commercial foods.

    We decided to see on oncologist for an expert opinion. One reason was our vet decided to treat with injectable neoplasene instead of oral. I was very concerned with all the tissue Vega was going to loose and his quality of life during this time. The oncologist said she would never treat mast cell like ours with neoplasene. She said that it could cause degranulation in a case like this and actually kill Vega. Too risky, too much pain and too many side effects. I’m glad we decided to go and see an expert!

    The oncologist said his case was and “easy case” and she has a lot of success with pallidia/kinavet. We have begun him on Pallidia, with prednisone (just for a short while) and pepcid, plus I’m following your diet and we are boosting his immunity by adding turmeric (vet’s suggestion), mushrooms, krill (staring with a lower dose until his belly get’s used to the palladia), L-glutamine (her suggestion). I can’t do the apocaps until he isn’t on the prednisone.

    So far Vega is doing very well and the vet thinks he will be fine and we that we can kick this. It’s been four days and his tumors are already very negligible.

    I’m very thankful that the medical industry has made great strides in the past few years for some of the dog cancer sufferers.

    I just wanted to give you an update and thank you again!!

  • Penni Kirkland & Maxie

    Should I give our 10 3/4 year old shepherd mix Maxie her monthly heartworm preventive? Our vet and orthopedic specialist have both said it’s our call. She was diagnosed with osteosarcoma on 9/11/12. Chemo, amputation and radiation are not an option. I don’t want to give her any more meds than necessary right now. She only goes outside to potty. It presented in her carpas and she’s on tramadol and gabapentin as needed for pain and prednisone for anti-inflammatory properties. She also has colitis so NSAIDS are not an option for her. Thanks for any advice/personal experience. Right now she’s happy and we’re cherishing every moment we have with her. Our last experience with osteosarcoma was awful. Our last rottie only made it 7 weeks after her diagnosis. I just felt helpless. Is there anything I can do to lessen her pain and give her more time? I used a diet for one of our dogs with bladder cancer that involved cottage cheese (not made with rennet) blended with fresh flax seed oil. We believe it gave him an extra 10 months. Thank you for any advice. She is our oldest canine child. Most of our rotties were lost to cancer. I want to know everything possible to make her happy and keep her from fracturing the affected joint. Thank you sincerely for this site! We’ve suffered through lymphosarcoma, osteosarcoma and bladder cancer with our dogs and lost the battle with each one. I believe in our vet but always wonder if I could have done more. I want to learn as much as possible to fight this awful disease.

  • Natalie

    My golden retriver is 12 years old and I found a lump on his R) leg and we saw our vet last night and he is sure it is lymphoma. I found your website through team Wyla . All his other glands felt normal and he is booked for a biopsy next week! He is eating well, has not lost weight and nil other obvious signs of illness. Over the past few weeks he has not been as active on his walks and more tired. My question is What would you suggest re: management. I have researched around chemotherapy and due to his age I do not feel it would be best option for him- as he has been through alot in his 12 years and has battling arthritis for years and was diagnosed with OCD as a pup. He also had Parvo as a pulpy and suffers from a very sensitive stomach- I have looked at your diet and think I would like to try this, however do not any to cause him gastric upsets. He is currently on daily carprofen 125 mg, glucosamine 1500 mg daily, fish oil 1500 mg bd and currently is have cartrophen inj 1.3 weekly for 4 weeks. He is on a restricted diet – 2 cups was eukanubra weight Mx ( now changed to Advance weight Mx ) and home made chicken breasts ground rice meatballs with zucchini, carrot broccoli, coconut, sun flour oil , parsley added in – however only limited to 3-4 a day, dry biscuits x2 and pedigree dentastix daily ( he has had weight issues in past and this seems to maintain his weight! I am very strict on treats. I am interested in information about supplements that would benefit him and advice on slowly changing his diet – as mentioned very sensitive stomach. I live in Australia and have a great vet, however i feel I need to be ready to discuss options with him and am hoping with all my heart that you will be able to provide me with some guidance around this! Thanks so much in advance from.brodee and myself.

  • Jessica

    I am hoping you might be able to elaborate on the precautions against some supplements based on liver and kidney conditions.

    I keep hitting a wall in researching how to address my dog’s hepatocellular carcinoma. Two weeks ago, my just-about-to-turn-11-years-old female Siberian Husky, Kai, had a five and a half pound massive intermediate grade HCC removed–in effect, a left liver lobectomy was done. The surgeon also found a smaller mass at the confluence of the bile ducts, but did not address it as it is not yet blocking the flow of bile, and Kai had already been in surgery for some time. One small mass was found in her chest radiographs. Neither of these additional masses has been biopsies. Clean margins were not achieved in removing the primary tumor. (Her right liver lobe is in tact, functioning, and without any apparent metastases.)

    In spite of all of this, Kai is symptom free, exceptionally bright and alert and happy, still feeling great, spirited, active, and joyful. We have had to hold her back– post-surgically–on activity, because she feels so great and is definitely raring to go.

    For all of this, I am exceptionally grateful. Not only is she doing well for a dog that has all of these medical concerns, she is doing great in general–very youthful to say the least.

    I am at a loss, however, with how to address her post-surgical management because, it seems, there are no conventional protocols that are considered particularly effective on HCC, and many of the supplements addressed in the Cancer Survival Guide (which I am currently reading, cover to cover) have precautions relating to dogs with liver and kidney issues. I am not sure if this means issues other than the cancer itself. Because she has a functioning right liver lobe, I am wondering if the precautions you advise are relevant to her or not.

    I am well underway with feeding a healthy supportive diet–all organic–boiled skinless chicken breast, boiled fresh veggies, all filtered water etc, and she is eating very well…I would have her on omegas, but had not wanted to give them again until after she is safely healed from her surgery.

    I am curious about where the veterinary community–conventional and/or alternative–is in regard to hepatocellular carcinoma. What other ways might we support Kai? I have a collection of supplements that I would like to add to her regimen, but I am not sure if they are a good idea, given her particular situation. We want to fight, and we are ready to take it on. We just need some guidance!

    Thank you, so much!!
    Jessica

  • gretchen

    My dog has had the first two treatments on the WI protocol One last thursday and one yesterday. He hasn’t responded yet, and still is not eating. The oncologist wants to try pred short term but i am afraid it will cause the rest of his treatment to be effective – if it indeed might work. What are your thoughts?

  • gretchen

    what i meant to say was “cause future treatments to be Ineffective.” thank you

  • Connie Almy

    PLEASE remember to remove rice (arsenic) and corn (GMOs) as ingredients in dog food recipes. Also, list them as DO NOT BUY in dry dog foods. Thank you.

  • Tiffany

    Are antibiotics safe for older dogs with cancer? My 14 year old great dane whose tummy is already very sensitive had a very bad experience with oral keflex on friday. She is going back in on Monday to get an antibiotic shot (not sure what kind – she has a UTI and we did not do a culture & sensitivity). What are safer options for a sensitive girl like her? I admit I’m afraid of the shot too, because I can pull the oral antibiotics when she gets sick, but how do you stop an adverse reaction to a long acting injection? I’m afraid!!

    • Dr. Susan Ettinger

      Tiffany,
      In general antibiotics are very safe for cancer patients. I use them commonly in my patients. While sometimes there are sensitivities to certain antibiotics in certain pets, your vet should be able to find one that works and that she tolerates. Good luck, Dr Sue

  • Ann M

    I have had 3 dogs with bladder cancer in the past 21 years. The first an American Eskimo had chemo – 3 different kinds progressively stronger that we had to stop due to some kidney damage tho she lived the last 11 months with only antibiotics for bladder infections and bimonthly shots of EPO in all she lived 26 months and that was before piroxicam was discovered to be helpful. She did get several antioxidants daily because of my research. The 2 nd one was Keeshond who only lived 8 months, but was older and may have had PHPT damage to her kidneys prior to the dx of TCC. The last one was also a Keeshond who had 5 chemo treatments( stopped due to low wbc levels and apparent remission) but she had the benefit of daily piroxcam and even more antioxidants and she lived 17+ months. All my dogs have been on reverse osmosis and extra filtered water after the first dog’s dx. Th first was exposed to second hand smoke for her first 2 yrs, but not the others. I think TCC is on the rise in all dogs an I have become the ‘go-to-person’ for advice in ‘fighting’ transitional cell carcinoma in my area and many breeds are developing it, sadly. Is there any new treatment n the horizon? research on causes? I purchased both the Nook and early paperback version of your book and have recommended it to several owners including my vet! who have purchased it. Nothing in particular on TCC the book but general guidelines. So what might be new with this crppy cancer which s usually inoperable? (sorry this is so long)

  • Cynthia Hornish

    I have been writing for several years. I since Have lost both my goldens at 13 1/2, both to cancer. One did live 2 yearsn 4 months longer due to your help, and his sister died 4 months later, got suddenly sick with cancer, while my mom was in an out of hospital. I still had my shitzu, who is not 8. He is now the issue. I am not sure what to do. He has always been a little on the heavy size, but he only eats 3/4 cup of food a day of natural balance with fresh chicken. Before the goldens died, I cooked for all of them, chicken, puree veges, pumpkinhamburger, vitamins, rice. My mom who is alost 92, is also one I take care of, so when my neighbors helped and gave Kobe Natural Balance and he ate it, I went to that food, with chicken, as it was easier as we are in and out of the hospital with mom. I also have a chiwawa which is my daughters, who gets 1/8a cup 2 times a day. I do need to hand feed Kobe (my shitzu) all the time, and have for as long as I can remember. Lately he is not always wanting to eat, so he will skip a meal, but only once or at most 2 times a week. He does not eat much and he does not loose weight. He is aout 22-24, hard to tell on their scale. A few years back he was 22 or so. He was bordenline on his thyroid, so one vet wanted thyroid, but he triglycerides were 1504 t4 1.1 t3 tt free t 4 28,3 alk phosphatase 265 all else normal do not know want to do. I am really worrried, but he plays, takes many walks, rans around from us as a game, I just do not know what to do. Please write and help Cynthia

  • Aurora Lee

    Hi, I am sorry if this quesiton has been asked, but I am wondering if the amount of ‘whole grain’ in the cancer diet (as described in the book: 1.5 cups of oatmeal or 1.25 cups of brown rice) is referring to the pre-cooked amount ? Thank you very much.

  • http://www.lizette.us Lizette Fitzpatrick

    Just had a question about the reverse osmosis water.

    I switched my 7 yr old dog, Chanel, over to it when I changed her to the cancer diet and Apocaps. She had been drinking mostly distilled water then before diagnosis some spring water. Anyway, she barely wants to drink it and will refuse the RO water even when I know she should be thirsty. I’m thinking of trying the water from a different store to see if it is because the store’s MF brand says it is “super oxygenated”. Maybe that is what she thinks is not good?

    So, since I haven’t seen this issue addressed in the book or website I’d like to ask you here.

    Chanel seems to be doing well on the diet and supplements along with the Melanoma vaccine. We go for the second one on Friday. She has had two malignant tumors removed. Her left eye that we hoped had cured her then a second one came back below her right eye on her cheek. That one had a bit of a dirty margin when removed. There has been no radiation or chemotherapy. My plan is to clean up her diet which was already pretty good and add the supplements and melanoma vaccine to extend her life.

    So, if I can figure out the RO water and why she’s not into it, we can get on with her cure.Thanks for all the valuable info in your book!

  • Mary

    Our 8 yr. old female 42# Aussie Shep. mix dog was diagnosed with agressive squamous cell carcinoma July 13, 2012 on the center of her tongue. The section of tongue removed showed the cancer was completely thru the tongue and actually looked worse on the under side. Her prognosis was not good and we didn’t expect her to live for more than a couple months. The cancer reappeared immediately after surgery and started growing. The Dr. said she would eventuallty just stop eating.

    I read everything on your site and started making her food from your receipe. We also gave her mashed raw eggplant with extra virgin olive oil & added fish oil, curcumin & maitake mushroom to it twice a day before her meal. I’ve seen on a TV show that an eggplant cream was healing this type of skin cancer on human skin so I decided to feed it to her instead. With her “real” food we added in a vitamin, sardines and chinese herbs. The sardines were one way to keep her eating in the beginning so we’ve just kept it up.

    4 months later her tongue is almost completely healed. We couldn’t believe it and were leary of rejoicing. Now she’s acting like she did as a puppy. WE believe it all to be true. Thank you for your care and concern for our 4 legged fur people we get so attached to.

    The thought that kept running thru my mind that I read was, “your dog wouldn’t give up on you so don’t give up on your dog.” Thank goodness we didn’t!

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Great news Mary! You might want to start up your apocaps if you haven’t already as a continued supplement under veterinary supervision.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Dede

    Dear Dr. Dressler

    Thank you for answering my fb post. I have search your site and read all the blogs that came up.

    I have a 4.5 year old puggles. He is a puppy-mill puppy with many allergies. Recently he had two fatty growths removed. I would like to start preventative cancer care. I would like to start curcumin but am unsure of dosage for 30 lb dog.

    Also after reading your site, I am uncertain if your apocap pills are for dogs that do not yet have cancer? Where do I find the ingredient list, since my dog has so many allergies, I always read the labels first.

    Thank you.

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Dede
      to keep healthy dogs healthy, I would suggest Everpup:
      http://everpup.com/
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Shirley Hoagland

    My 11yr old schnauzer has been diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma. Location & size makes it inoperable (on back near tail & too large to get any margins). Per vet recommendation I am giving her Thymex, Immune Support and Enteric Support & feeding her whole foods. I am considering your Apocaps & plan to start using your diet. I am wondering about Modified Citrus Pectin use with Apocaps. Do you recommend using both?

  • Judith Clark

    Dr Dressler,
    Our Scotty was biopsy Dx (a symptomatic) May of this yr.with Lymphosarcoma ,grade B cells. Immediately referred to an Oncologist who started the Wisconsin Protocol,following extensive Dx testing. We, in the meantime immediately purchased your book and all supplements and dietary recommendations,with little to NO improvements. Our Vet & the Oncologist was totally dismissive of your approach re boosting the Immune System, while continuing traditional Tx.
    I’m a NP who feels compelled to give you feedback re your optimistic but unrealistic” attitude toward your Tx. I would Never have agreed to Chemo, had I not been repeatedly assured that she would go into remission and recapture some quality of life. With great remorse we euthanized our beloved little girl within 6 mo. Of Tx, based on the side effects of the increasing doses of corticosteroids, in addition to the Chemo.
    The critically missing element from my Vet, the Oncologist, and most importantly you,was to guide us as to when to consider “enough is enough”. We willingly spent thousands of dollars to ad some enjoyment to her life, which never happened.
    Please know we appreciate your efforts in defining and Tx Canine Cancer, but it easily installs “false hopes into the Guardians role.
    Hope you can assimilate this experience into your progressive efforts.
    Judith Clark, RN

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Judith,
      I am sorry to hear that you lost your Scotty. This is very difficult and there is little I can say or do to alleviate the pain of this kind of loss.
      I am able though to comment on what you wrote concerning false hope. One of the important features emphasized in the Guide is both treatment plan analysis as well as emphasizing life quality, and finally matching the treatment with your personal feelings as a guardian. We also discussed what median survival means, which is the time when half the dogs are still with us and have have passed away. When we say that a chemo protocol yields say 11 months median survival, this means that at 11 months, half the dogs have succumbed to the disease. It is tempting to create an expectation based on these numbers, but in reality we have to take them with a very large grain of salt.
      I am sorry but I do not at this time have a cure for cancer, and I hope I did not convey this to anyone out there. If so, I apologize.
      Dr D

  • ‘Genie

    My Belgian Malinois, ConTiki, began to show signs of cancer last November.
    I purchased your book and now am doing what I can. I cook for Tiki daily.
    My husband built her a ramp to walk on instead of stairs, she was so weak. She
    could hardly walk, or hardly bark. Since then, this summer, and now into this fall
    and winter, she has done extremely well. We also feed game meat which we hunt
    (elk, deer meats). I am cooking for her, still, giving her the Apocaps, also K9 Immunity Plus, plus the various supplements, most of the ones you recommend.
    I am also giving her the Melaleuca vitamins, (by the Idaho Falls, ID based Melaleuca company). The vitamins are some of the best; I take them and have
    given them to my dogs for years as well. One other item I had recently began
    giving to Tiki is Two Feathers Healing Formula by the company in Reno, NV. I
    feel this original Black Salve, very expensive, has done wonders in conjuntion
    with all the other natural meds. She had a baseball sized tumor; now it is like a
    pancake. I am also using the Healing Formula on a spider bite that is drawing
    out infection on myself). Tiki has a lot of energy for being over 10 years old,
    going on 11 in March 2013. She walks with me on our goat ranch and even
    barked strongly to alert me to some pheasant hunters in a neighbor’s large
    acreage 1/2 a mile away from us while we were with the goats! I am recommend-
    ing your product to others. Granted, one must watch the Two Feathers Healing
    Formula; if you put it on a tumor, you are advised to CALL THEM FIRST before
    taking action. That salve really helps….MANY testimonials to it drawing cancer
    from many people. I have others telling me the stories themselves, also.
    Thanks for the book, the diet and the meds.
    Sincerely,
    ‘Genie in NW Wyoming, USA

  • Nancy Gigliello

    Dr Dressler,
    I have an English Springer Spaniel who will be 13 on Jan 30. She looks and acts much younger and people mistake her for a puppy. She was just diagnosed with nasal cavity cancer. The first sympton that we recognized was a nose bleed from the left side of her nose which lasted for 45 mins on Jan 4. She was seen by her vet the next day. Our vet gave us some ideas as to what could cause it but cancer was not on the top of the list and it was decided to monitor her. She would have a small drop of blood infrequently, sneezing and other signs that we now know were symptoms of the cancer. She was seen by our vet in May for her physical and nothing new was noted. In Oct I took her to see the vet for a little more bleeding from the left side of her nose and we decided to have radiograhs and a biopsy done. The radiograhs showed a mass in the left side of her nasal cavity but the biopsy came back negative. Our vet referred her to an oncologist. We took her and she had a CT scan and biopsy. The CT scan showed a mass on the left side including the area around the eye orbit and some evidence on the right side near the eye. The biopsy came back possitive for adenocarcinoma. We decided that she will have palliative treatment and recieve radiation treatment 1x/wk for 3 weeks. I read your book after the radiograf and I realized that there was a real possibility that she could have cancer. I still didn’t have a difinitive diagnosis. I have started her on Hill’s Prescription ND (I believe that I’ve read that you recommend this for nasal cavity cancer) canned dog food and Bule Buffalo Wilderness, salmon recipe grain free. One half cup of each 2x/day. I also give her yogurt, sardines, brown rice and other supplemental food that you recommend in your book but have not yet started her on your dog food recipe or apocaps since we just recieve the diagnosis this week. She is also on Proin for bladder control and glucosimine. After both biopsies she had a nose bleed that continued dripping for a few hours. The oncologist thought this was due to the anesthesia raising her b/p rather than the biopsy. She requested that I give her yunnan baiyo which I did and will give it to her the night before her first radiation treatment. Her quality of life is so good now that it is had to believe what is going on inside her head. We know that there is no cure for this type of cancer and only want her quality of life to continue as long as possible. Could you please give me advice as to what more we can do for her? I love her so much and want to make sure that I’m making the right decissions for her. She has given me so much.
    Thank you in advance.
    Nancy

  • Nancy Chilcote

    Hello, my six year old Maltese/Shitzu dog daughter Chloe may have lung cancer. I say “may” as no test yet has come back positive. They found lesions in her lungs but the needle aspiration came back negative. We are getting the cancer test from Webster. Do you know anything about that? Also, if she does have lung cancer, she has had a liver shunt repair and it was successful. All of her liver enzymes are normal for the past three years. Is it ok to give her the Apocaps? I am going crazy right not because I don’t want to believe it’s cancer. How can we be certain? Thank you and God bless you!

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Nancy, This is a new test that according to the manufacturer seems to have good data.
      http://www.vdilab.com/page.php?id=60
      We will see what the actual field results are over the next few years as more information is gathered. another method you could use to try to get cells out of the lungs to see what you are dealing with is a bronchoalveolar lavage or a re-aspirate.
      A diagnosis is important before you start cancer treatment.
      I would start here:
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/an-overview-of-what-else-can-i-do/
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Nancy Chilcote

    Dear Dr. Dressler, thank you for taking time to help guide as there is just no where to turn for good holistic advice with regards to cancer in dogs. I love Chloe and this is so hard to think about. I’m doing what I can, but I don’t want to overdo wiht too many suppments. Would glutathione help for dogs with cancer? Also, is it possible to give too many “good” supplements? I’m putting Chloe (still not confirmed – but they think lung cancer) on your cancer diet and wondered if you knew anything about Standard Process? I have her on canine immune and canine whole body as well as pneumotrophin which is a human supplement for lungs.

    God Bless you for all you do to help those suffering with this terrible disease.

    Nancy

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Nancy,
      there is a whole section in the Dog Cancer Survival Guide which has listed essentially all the supplements and a discussion of which are high priority (so you can pick the few you would like to use) and which are lower priority, and which can be used with other treatments and which cannot. You need to understand what you are doing, and how these things fit together. For example, if you are using Apocaps, artemisinin, or Neoplasene, glutathione would not make any sense because those are prooxidant therapies and glutathione is antioxidant. If you were sticking with a more antioxidant strategy, I’d be leaning towards palladium complex (expensive), flax lignans, and possibly Iv vitamin C.
      I would suggest you take some time, educate yourself, and use veterinary guidance when you pick supplements for your dog to be safe and effective.
      Here is a website to find an integrative vet in your area:
      http://www.viim.org/directory/
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Dawn

    My 7 yr old pekingese, Abbey, was just diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, well differentiated. An option I am looking at is palliative radiation with metronomic chemotherapy using chlorambucil. Abbey wears a diaper some of the time so we’ve been told the chlorambucil is the best choice because of that. Do you know much about or can you point me in the direction of some studies with these therapies? Your book came in the mail the day before her diagnosis.

  • Dawn

    Sorry I forgot to say it’s in her nasal cavity.

  • Nancy Gigliello

    Dr Demian Dressler

    I wrote to you earlier regarding my 12 yr old English Springer Spaniel who has been diagnosed with nasal cavity cancer. She had her first symptom one year ago and after a referral to an oncologist, ct scan and biopsy she was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. I decided against radiation treatment due to the side effects, primarily blindness. You recommended Apocaps and I have ordered them. You also recommended an immune supplement. I would like to know which kind? You mentioned neoplasene and high dose Vit C. There is a holistic vet near me who uses neoplasene and I’m considering making an appt with her. However, I have read mixed reviews regarding this treatment. One review cited a side effect where their dog acted as though he was burning up inside and another which stated their dog had to be taken off of it due to severe diarhea. Could you please address the side effects of neoplasene. Is it compatible with Apocaps, Vit C and the high dose of Vit C you mentioned. My dog will turn 13 on the 30th (her life expectancy) and I don’t want her discomfort to be from a side effects that I have imposed on her but would like her to be as comfortable as possible. At the same time it would be wonderful if the cancer could be arrested. Right now her quality of life is very good and she still looks like a puppy dispite the progression of her cancer.

    Thank you,
    Nancy

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Nancy,
      beta glucan suppements including K-9 immunity are the ones I usually reach for. You need to use an anti-emetic with neoplasene to help with the vomiting issue. i usually use mirtazapine. i do combine the two but use lower doses of each (half label) when i do so. I have no problem combining these with high dose Vit C. Please discuss with your vet, as always. Side effects are always possible, and nasal tumors can be tough. I would start everything slowly in this case, staging each to start every 7-10 days or so to assess for intolerances.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Charles Brawnyson

    I love your blog so much! It is really helpful and has really helped me take better care of my dogs. I’m looking for good emergency veterinarians in Gilbert. If anyone knows of a good clinic please let me know. Thanks!

  • http://spellboundcollies.com Jill

    Hello. In early September 2012 my 11 year old dog as diagnosed with TCC (bladder cancer). The tumor was on the apex so surgery was recommended. On September 25th she had surgery to remove the tumor. Unfortunately, when the biopsy results came back the margins were not clean – there were microscopic cancer cells seen and it was a high grade tumor with a high risk of spreading. I met with an oncologist and I opted for piroxicam and the metronomic chemo treatment using leukeran. Within 5 weeks the tumor was growing back so we switched to vinblastine. After 4 treatments the tumor had significantly shrunk so we were about to go to every other week when she developed an infection. Copious amount of drinking, wouldn’t eat, I could see she didn’t feel well etc etc. This began the SAME day as chemo (Thursday) so I reported it to the oncologist. That was the same day he told me her white blood cell count was ‘great’ – he even used the term ‘normal’ and was all psyched about it. I can see why it was so high – because she had a bad infection brewing BEFORE he even gave her the chemo. Anyhow, when I reported to him that she was drinking and not feeling well and I felt she had an infection he told me to keep him posted. Thru the weekend she was getting worse but he didn’t seem concerned since all he told me was to ‘keep him posted’. I complained of her not eating – he said he’d call in an appetite stimulant. I explained to him she didn’t need that – that my dogs eat when they feel well – when they don’t they don’t eat. I know her MO with the chemo (she does get GI issues) but this was NOT it. Now this oncologist is very esteemed and well known.. he SHOULD have known better and been more proactive hearing her symptoms. I thought it was maybe a UTI but what do I know? All I knew was she had an infection and HE should have done something to check her out. She was going downhill and by Monday morning the sutures from her first surgery split open and burst. There was blood all over. I RUSHED her to the vet referral center where she had the original surgery to remove the tumor in September (they also do her chemo there). One vet said the cancer had spread the other said it as an infection. Based on her symptoms for 4 days prior to this I felt it as an infection. However, she was in the vets from 7:45am until I picked her up that day at 6pm and they had not even given her any antibiotics. Her blood work was normal. Urine was good – it showed 1+ blood but everything else was fine. They scoped her (open wound) and told me there was necrotic tissue in there that needed to come out but the surgeon felt the chemo caused the infection and it was just a matter of cleaning that area out an restitching with new tissue. They gave me zenequin and clavamox to give at home but I was appalled at the fact they didn’t give her antibiotics while there for almost 12 hours. Anyhow, her white blood cell count was 11,000 had been running between 2-4k with chemo so that confirmed to me there was an infection. Anyhow, after meeting with 2 different surgeons (who thought it was infection based) I opted to do yet another surgery to clean the suture wound area. They did see an unusual (suspicious) tissue attached to the abdominal wall right behind where the sutures blew out. The board certified (diplomate) surgeon wasn’t sure if it was part of the infection (pre-necrotic tissue) or possibly cancerous so she did a biopsy and we are awaiting results. There was some but not allot of pus and very little nectroic tissue but this was 4 days after she began the above named antibiotics .

    I can’t find allot of research material on cancers that seed to the incision so can you, Dr. Dressler or Dr Ettinger give me any info. Everyone basically is saying if it seeded then that wouldn’t be a good thing but no one is saying much more than that. The oncologist said it would be unusual if the vinblastine was shrinking the bladder tumor so well but then have such a major issue with cancer if it had seeded on the incision. He said it wasn’t impossible but he felt it would be rare. But he said if it was it was not a good thing.

    I think their consensus is pretty much ‘let her go’ if the biopsy comes back as cancer. I have spent 3.5 months of doing everything I can – traditional and allot of alternative and complementary things. I have spent over $12k in 3+ months and I am resentful that everyone, in-spite of the fact she is healthy and happy so quickly wants to put her down. The reason why I took it this far was everyone told me she could have all this time if we did all this stuff. The oncologist was saying if we got this cancer under control she could have 12-18 months. I had her on piroxicam and she got black stools so we had to take her off of that and she has been on metacam. I am doing vitamins, nutrition, chemo, hands on healing, acupuncture, everything I can do help her. She gets allot of exercise and fresh air (we live in the country and I have an acre fenced in for the dogs). I home cook meals for her. I invested in two water filters – a reverse osmosis and the Zero water filter for when we are not home.. which actually filters as good if not better than the reverse osmosis.

    On Monday they gave me the option of euthanizing her when she was at the specialty vet referral center with this open suture issue and infection. I went over to see her (thinking I’d be saying goodbye to her) and she was perky and wanted to go out and when I took her for a walk she was playing and play bowing with me, waging her tail wanting to go play with other dogs, etc etc so NO WAY was I putting her down. She walks back into the vets (she LOVES going to the vets) and begins working the room -saying hello to everyone and wanting pets and kisses. She is a show dog and loves people and going places. I KNOW My dog when she doesn’t feel well and this was not it. When they put us in a room she was knocking at the door for me to open it so she could watch the waiting room area until the vet came in. I didn’t think this we the MO of a dog that needs to be euthanized. She was much better since the infection as draining. When the vet came in she asked me what I had decided to do (did she actually think I was going to euthanize her??). I told her I felt comfortable taking her home and then deciding how to proceed.

    I took her out of that vet and took her elsewhere because I was tired of hearing every week that the cancer had spread. Two weeks before they told me she has a pericardial effusion and they said the cancer spread to her heart. I had a chest x-ray done it didn’t show any spread nor a pericardial effusion. I had an echo done and there was no cancer, no pericardial effusion and her heart was great for an 11 year old and the cardiologist told me that pericardial effusions don’t generally disappear in a week. They even approved her for that chemo that was hard on the heart, if it was ever needed. Lymph nodes in the chest were normal. All signs were positive. The ultrasound of the abdomen from 4 weeks before showed everything normal no sign of cancer spreading and all lymph nodes were normal. The ultrasound from Monday with this terrible infection – no sign of spread in the abdomen a few of the lymph nodes were enlarged but they said was probably the infection but so far no sign of cancer spreading. Yet everything that happens they tell me the cancer spread and I then spend hundreds or thousands of dollars for testing to show there was no cancer spread. I KNOW one day I will need to deal with the inevitable,and maybe it is now but I would like to have some quality time where I am not always stressed worrying and wondering if I am doing the right thing and then end up spending thousands on testing, etc. Needless to say I have left that vet and feel comfortable with this vet that did the ‘suture wound’ surgery that came very highly recommended by others that I know that also show their dogs.. and she also does work with many rescue breeds. She is compassionate and I feel very good at what she does.

    Anyhow, if the biopsy comes back as cancer.. I am not sure what to do. The consensus from that first vet referral center is stop treating and let her go. I will arrange a consult at this new vet with her oncologist to see what he says but I feel I need some facts and info before I do that. I now understand how ‘seeding’ happens. If the cancer has seeded I can’t help but wonder how careful they were during surgery. I also understand that it can compromise the incision but can it be treated? If so what are some of the possible options for treatment? Does it cause infections? She seems happy and her quality of life seems great. I am NOT going to let her suffer if there is no hope. That I can’t do. Infact, I feel like I am at the end of my rope as far as what I can do. I felt like I was having a heart attack thru all this stress.. turns out it was a panic attack. I am a 9-11 survivor and I have some of my own health issues so dealing with all this stress is not good.

    Any info or guidance would be helpful. My main concern right now is the incision and to insure that it heals properly. The surgeon said there was only a little pus and very little necrotic tissue when she cleaned it out but that was after 4 days on very strong antibiotics.

    Any suggestions and/or info would greatly be appreciated.

    Thank you!

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Jill
      sorry about all this. Ugh.
      As to the incision, it would be prudent to get a culture done so you can identify the microbe and select the correct antiobiotic…that’s what I would normally do at any rate. If it comes back as cancer I would start by reading the Guide to get you an overall plan and some additional guidance.
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • Marion Lindsay

    Hello Dr Dressler.
    Our Black Lab/Rottie Boston,.age 9.5 yrs has been diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma with metastasis to liver. Took him to specialists for second opinion and they determined this was the diagnosis. We opted not to have surgery due to the predicted outcome of short life span. Also due to the fact that the surgeon said he would make it through the surgery but concerned about how the other organs would act post surgery, like the brain, etc. We want his quality of life to be as good as it can be, and were concerned about his last days/months being in recovery from surgery. Have started K9 immunity plus yesterday and think it is helping. Have ordered Yunnan Baiyao to help stop hemorrhaging. He takes arnica and china (homeopathic) from our vet to help slow down bleeding. He had a fantastic day yesterday, swimming, walking, and he is still eating and drinking. His warm swollen belly went down yesterday (from hemorrhaging) but then last night it swelled up again and was warm to touch. Maybe we could try a belly wrap with elastic bandage in hope it might stop the bleeding? We want to get the apocaps from amazon but they don’t ship to Canada and wondering if there is a way I can get them sent to me ? I have American friends so might have to resort to having them get them and then forwarding to me by courier, as I need them asap as in yesterday. When we took him to the specialist not long ago he was deemed stable, no arrhythmia, and he is a big strong boy. Wondering if we have done the right thing in not getting the surgery. I asked the specialist could the tumours on the liver be benign , something dogs get with old age, and she said no, they know the difference. She said there is a floating tumour as well, maybe on the liver,and I believe there are a couple of tumours on the liver. So mad with our vet ( a new vet cos our old one retired). About 2 mths ago he swallowed a whole bag of greenies and then became ill, eating only half of his meal, etc. I was going to take him to emerg but she said to wait till the morning as he was not vomiting so no blockage. Next day she did blood tests and xray and said she saw undigested food (greenies) and there was some fluid that concerned her. But then when the blood tests came back normal except for white cell count up, she treated him for pancreatitis with antibiotics. He improved but then started going off his food again and his tummy swelled. Took him in to vet and she said it is terminal, hemangiosarcoma. We hoped when we took him to the specialists they would operate and tell us that he had a hematoma or some other benign situation with the spleen, and the liver tumours would turn out to be from old age. I understand the only way they know for sure it is cancer is with surgery and pathology. Dogs have been euthanized and later when an autopsy was done it was determined they had a benign situation with both the spleen and the liver. Just hope we have done the right thing choosing no surgery. My email address is mariontlindsay@gmail.com – Hoping u can tell me how to get apocaps asap shipped to Canada. Thanks. – Marion

  • Marion Lindsay

    While we have no apocaps, thought I would give Boston turmeric, which is in the apocaps. Gave him 4 of the 750 mg capsules last night. We usually give him cottage cheese and flaxseed oil too (Budwig diet for cancer), and sardines with omega 3, etc. Is it okay to give things that thin the blood? Was it not a good thing to do to give a big dose of turmeric last night? Is the aim not to give anything that thins the blood? When a human has blood clots they get blood thinners – I know that dogs and humans can not have this right before surgery though as they will bleed more. Omega 3 oil is good to fight cancer but it is also a blood thinner. Rights or wrongs of giving these things to Boston, please?

  • Marion Lindsay

    We bought your book on the cancer diet for dogs, ebook format. We were already not giving Boston store bought food, since the diagnosis. We cook liver, lean hamburger and pork, etc. Thank you for writing this book and for making the apocaps and all your research to help dogs with cancer.

  • http://jillsjourney.tripawds.com/ Erica

    Hi Dr. D,

    My Jill is an 8 year old Kitty who has osteosarcoma. She had her rear leg amputated 2 months ago and is currently undergoing chemo (2 rounds of carbo, 2 rounds of doxorubicin). I am an active member on tripawds.com and so many people on there talk about your book and things they can do for their dogs during and after treatment. However, I of course have a kitty cat :) Since OSA is so rare in kitties, I’ve had so much trouble finding out information. Do you know of any books/resources? I just want to make sure I can give her the best after-care once the chemo is done – but I don’t know if the same rules apply (ie can I give her k-9 immunity, apococaps, etc.) I just dont want to feel “lost” after chemo is over and as if I am doing nothing – I want to give her the best shot possible. Any advice you can offer would be much appreciated!!

    Erica & Jill

  • Cheryl Gorewitz

    In January 2013, my 13 year old golden retriever received a preliminary and unconfirmed diagnosis of Lymphoma. I purchased your book and started her immediately on your Dog Cancer Diet and recommended supplements. Since then, additional tests (from bone biopsy of lesion on L2 vertebrae) had revealed a confirmed diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma, not Lymphoma. Sadly, I find absolutely NOTHING in your book that addresses Multiple Myeloma, recommended diet and/or supplements. What’s up with that? Do you have some recommendations for me specific to Multiple Myeloma?

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Cheryl
      I am sorry to hear about your dog. As to coverage, the book covers the most common types of cancer, and multiple myeloma is more rare than most, although not unheard of. To cover all the cancers, a textbook would be required and the size of the book would literally be too large for this format. At any rate, both the diet and supplement recommendations are oriented around common pathways, shared derangement, and overlapping metabolic issues that cancers have in general. So the dog cancer diet and supplement protocols would apply to a dog with multiple myeloma as well, under the guidance of your veterinarian. If you have other questions, please let us know and we will do our best to address them.
      Best
      Dr D

  • kim

    Hi! I have an animal rehab for critically/terminally ill victims of cruelty. I have a client with a senior boxer recently diagnosed with Stage 1 lymphoma. The affected gland was removed and she is in her third week of chemo using the vincristine/pred protocol.
    Here is my question: The treating vet insists that this dog be hospitalized during her chemo treatment. She is taken on Monday morning and has to stay until Thursday evening. I have cared for many dogs with cancer and never encountered this situation. In my experience, the suffering animals are more comfortable and eat better at home. It’s also my understanding that limiting stress as much as possible is critical. The only explanation offered by this vet is that the drug is excreted in waste and could present a hazard. If this is accurate, I am wondering about the exposure all the other cancer dogs I’ve worked with have presented. This simply doesn’t make good sense to me, but I am aware of the limitation of my knowledge and hoping you can offer some clarification. I would love to see this dog have the opportunity to spend as much time as possible with her loving family rather than unnecessarily (if that is indeed the case) kept away from them and subjected to the 24/7 stress of being kept in a loud, frightening emergency clinic for four straight days.
    Thank you in advance for any input you can offer. It will help me in my care ofany special friends.

    Sincerely,

    Kim Lea
    Wishaven Animal Rehabilitation
    High Point, NC

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Kim
      here is a good article in dog chemo and urinary excretion:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20102496
      after about 3 days there is extremely little urinary vincristine metabolite excretion. Having said that one can wear gloves and irrigate the area soiled with urine with a lot of running water and these precautions can help reduce exposure significantly.
      Vomit is different, and this should not be handled with dogs on oral chemo without gloves.
      disposal of solid waste (poop), in my opinion, should occur with gloves, for at least 3 weeks following the last treatment to be safe.
      Both vomit and solid waste should be bagged in sealed plastic bags that do not leak and discarded.
      People with immune compromise (AIDS, cancer, pregnant, chronic active hepatitis, on immune suppressive drugs, etc) should not handle oral chemo drugs.
      Chemo pills or tables should not be broken or split.
      Saliva chemo content is a little hazy and varies between drugs used. Best to not allow licking for about 3 weeks after the last chemo to be safe.
      Please be sure to consult with your oncologist though on each of these items.
      In summary though, the practice you mention in your question would be considered very unusual.
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • Cathy

    Hi Dr. Dressler,

    I read your Canine Cancer Survival guide 15mo ago when my dog was diagnosed with Lymphoma. I strongly believe the Apocaps along with the K9 Immunity are a huge contributing factor to how well she’s tolerated everything and still going strong. If you met her you’d never know anything was going on with her. Amazing!

    I read back then to not do the Apocaps and K9 w/transfer factor and to just do the Immunity…..but recently, I see a lot of reviews mentioned the use of both. Those, too, seem to be the longest survival times. Is it ok now? And to be clear, I’m talking about the K9 Immunity Plus w/Transfer Factor 3 in 1 sausage looking treats.

    Thank you in advance,

    Cathy & Ky

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Cathy,
      That’s great that your pooch is doing well, good work! I’m thinking maybe you were thinking about some of my comments about the old formulation of the chewable k-9 immunity, which had some aspects that made me less enthused compared to the strait mushroom extract capsules. the company has since changed the formulation and i think its better. So no worries, we use them all together…under veterinary supervision.
      Best,
      Dr D

  • Susan Lauer

    Dr. Dressler,
    Are you going to discuss the effect of multiple and repeated unnecessary vaccinations on cancer and the effect of spot-on and other pesticides on dogs and around them from lawn services, exterminators, etc? Thanks, Susan Lauer

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Susan
      these are important points discussed at length in the Guide for those who are interested in more info. They are complex topics…
      Best, Dr D

  • Daniel

    Hi Dr Dressler
    I have an eight year old german shepard,Heidi that has been diagnosed with a large infiltrative lipoma on her rear thigh.Fine needle aspirates were done as was a ct scan the lipoma extends from her hip to her knee. we have had several courses of treatment presented to us from surgery and radiation,just surgery,and since it does not seem to bother her she runs and jumps to just leave it alone and watch for further growth.my question is do you have any recommendations as far as diet and supplements that would arrest or possibly shrink this lipoma.we are currently using your raw diet from your book and have her on apocaps.
    Dan

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Dan,
      these are pretty tough tumors I must confess. I suppose in addition to what you are using right now, under veterinary supervision I’d give additional curcumin above what’s in apocaps and something with chromium, choline and carnitine to enhance fat burning. Here’s an option: http://shop.robbinspetcare.com/best-for-your-pet-mega-lipo-tropic-120-capsules-p-5892.html. I have not used this but it might be one to discuss with your vet.
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • http://jillsjourney.tripawds.com Erica

    My Jill is an 8 year old Kitty who has osteosarcoma. She had her rear leg amputated 2 months ago and just finished chemo (2 rounds of carbo, 2 rounds of doxorubicin). I know you focus mostly on doggies, but I was wondering if you’ve ever used metronomics in cats. We are thinking of putting her on metronomic cytoxan.
    Thanks!

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      HI Erica
      we don’t have much in the way of metronomic for cats at this time to my knowledge. Let me know if you find something different-
      Best
      Dr D

    • Dr. Susan Ettinger

      Hi Erica,
      I hope Jill is doing well. I have used metronomic Palladia in cats, but not Cytoxan. You are being treated at AMC, right?
      Dr Sue

  • donna

    Our dog Murphy has been diagnosed with histiocytic sarcoma. He has his first appointment with the oncologist at Michigan State Veterinary School tomorrow, his amputation was 3 1/2 weeks ago. It’s been a long process already..he started limping in October and we just got a final diagnosis less than 2 weeks ago. Since he has been on & off his pain meds I have held off on giving him his frontline & heartguard, and was wondering if it would be ok to give them? We live in Michigan, and we don’t always medicate through the winter months anyways, but now the weather is getting nice and I’m concerned.
    thanks!

  • http://jillsjourney.tripawds.com Erica

    Dr Sue,

    Yes Jill is being treated at AMC under Dr. Hohenhaus’ care! She is doing FANTASTIC. Jill has been done with IV chemo for one month (she had four rounds total, 2 of doxy, 2 of carbo). She’ll have a check up next week to make sure her lungs are still all clear and blood work looks good and then start metronomic cytoxan. My only hesitation is that there is NO info on it in cats, I think she may be the first one!! I know SO many dogs from tripawds.com that have done it (and those do it with an NSAID, which of course is not done with a cat), so I just feel a little uncomfortable doing something there is no research on! I just want to give her the best chance possible! The only reason we are even going this aggressively with her (since OSA is not treated so aggressively in kitties) is because the OSA started in her toe, which was amputated first and then 6 months later a met appeared in the same leg, which was then amputated.
    Thanks as always!
    Erica & Kitty Tripawd Jill

  • Hiroe

    My 11 years old rottie/german shephard mix had a splenectomy in April and the biopsy result was spleen hemagiosacroma. The vet just told me to spoil her for the rest of her life because she would only has a couple of month to live. Luci ( my dog’s name) has a good appetite, normal bowl movement, and a lot of energy to play and/or go for a walk. I didn’t accept what I was told by the vet, so I started researching online and found Dog Cancer Survival Guide. However, I purchased apocaps and K9 immunity plus before I actually ordered the book. I read through the book as soon as it arrived and noticed that Dr. Dressler doesn’t suggest K9 immunity plus because it contains sugar which is not good for the dog with cancer. I also noticed that the site on the book ( www. dogcancershop.com) still carries K9 immunity plus. Is it ok to give my dog K9 immunity plus? or should I return this and buy K9 immunity and Trance factor?

  • Nancy Gigliello

    Dear Dr Dressler.
    I have contacted you twice before regarding my English Springer Spaniel’s battle with nasal cavity cancer. I have found your comments and suggestions very helpful. Your “Dog Cancer Survival Guide” has helped me make decisions on how to treat the cancer and has also helped me as I cope with her diagnosis.

    She was diagnosed this past fall with adenocarcinoma. Although we now know that her first symptom that, we were aware of, was Jan 4, 2012 when she had her first nose bleed. The tumor was very close to her left eye orbit and had also spread to the other side. The Oncologist said that she would have about 3 months to live without radiation treatment and 6-8 months with treatment, which she recommended. I decided not to have her go through the treatment due to the side effects which included losing her vision and her age.

    I have been following your recommended diet with the addition of some of Hill’s Science Diet ND. I give her K9 Immunity Plus (started 3 wks ago) and up until last week was giving her Apocaps, 5 caps per day (started 4 months ago). Recently, she developed nasal congestion and was not able to breath through her nose and eat at the same time. She sounded as though she might be aspirating her food. She also became very anxious at night and I believe this was breathing related. I asked my Vet if we could start her on Doxycycline and Piroxicam since I had read that these two drugs have been used with some success in treating nasal cancer. She agreed (she has also been supportive of the Apocaps). At that time, she also had a bilateral ear infection and was given antibiotic ear drops.

    I stopped the Apocaps because I had read that if they are given in combination
    with Piroxicam there could be side effects which could include bleeding. Her breathing seems to be better since she has been on these meds and her energy level has improved (this may also be due to the K9 Immunity since she has only been on this for about 3 wks). I would like to know from you if there is anyway the two meds can safely be given together? I’m concerned about losing ground by not having her on the Apocaps.

    She has now lived 5 months passed the time that the Oncologist gave her 3 months, she is happy, energenic, loves to eat and has a good quality of life. I am so grateful for your book. I feel that every new day with my dog, Baylea, is a gift.

    Thank you,
    Nancy

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Nancy
      we usually reduce the dose of apocaps with nsaid drugs like piroxicam to 1/4 -1/2 of the labeled dose and if your dog has a delicate tummy give with a full meal.
      See if your vet agrees to try that approach…if you are very concerned could add cytotec too.
      Best
      d

  • Cassandra

    Are apocaps safe for diabetic dogs?

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Cassandra,
      We have seen no adverse events related to your question. When Apocaps were first formulated, there was a precaution based on a very low risk seen in humans of lowering blood sugar, but we have not seen this in the dog. As always, please use veterinary supervision.
      Thanks!
      Dr D

  • Sandra Dighton

    I wrote before regarding my Casey. He’s a 9 year old Corgi who has been battling lymphoma since March 2012. He has one more drug left in his 2nd CHOP protocol. He has had multiple blood panels and, this last time, he had an elevated BUN and a urinalysis showed excess protein. He has been on the Dog Cancer Diet and was on Orijen, but I have switched him back to Halo because of this. What can I do to help lower his BUN? He takes Denamarin, fish oil, Pepcid AC, and Fortiflora. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! The oncologist believes that this is dietary and not from chemo/cancer.

    Thank you, Sandy Dighton

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Hi Sandra,
      did your onc suggest it was at a dangerous level and related to kidney function? If so you could under veterinary supervision consider a product like Azodyl.
      Best
      D

  • Stacey ONeal

    My 6yo female Chow, Fluffy, was diagnosed with oral melanoma today. She has a 0.6 cm mass on her tongue and I was told it was stage 1. No one would guess she is sick by looking at her as she shows no symptoms. The oncologist couldn’t conclusively confirm spread to the lymph nodes without getting them out although they noted a large volume of dark cells from the aspirates sample taken. She said it could just be melanocytes but due to the large volume she believes the melanoma is in the lymph nodes. Her treatment recommendation is surgical removal of tongue mass and lymph nodes followed by radiation and melanoma vaccines. The cost of the vaccine is prohibitive for us (over $2900 for the first 4 shots only) and the survival rate doesn’t increase enough for me to justify the vaccines. My regular vet said he has good success with homeopathic remedies. Considering Fluffy’s young age, good health, and Stage 1 diagnosis, what would be your recommendation for treatment?

    • Dr. Demian Dressler

      Dear Stacy,
      sorry to hear about your Fluffy..I have a loved Chow myself.
      Well, there are some other considerations.
      I would start here- this will at least get you on the right track. Homeopathy, alone, will not be enough, you’ll need more than that. You should also find out what is meant by “good success” with homoepathy in the realm of metastatic melanoma. In my experience you will need much, much more.
      Here:
      http://www.dogcancerblog.com/an-overview-of-what-else-can-i-do/
      under veterinary supervision, consider:
      diet
      chemo (carboplatin based), get an MDR mutation test first
      apocaps
      flax http://www.dogcancerblog.com/cancer-spread-flax-and-dog-cancer/
      beta glucans
      possibly oral neoplasene with mirtazapine
      to name a few
      I hope this helps
      Dr D

  • DESIREE

    Hi Dr., greetings from Spain (yeah.. I am from Spain). I have read your book and I am following the full spectrum guide the best I can. My vet doesn´t speak English so it´s me who made the research in English (always better than Spanish when refering to vet care) and found your book. Thanks a lot for the complete, loving and respectful gift you have given to all dog lovers. But I cannot stop thinking, May I be doing something wrong because I am not a pro? My vet didn´t know anything about Apocaps,diet, a full spectrum approach…., not even the Onco she has brought in the team ( in fact there´s another med, Apoptus, which the onco suggested and I refuse to use because by then I was one of your “believers”. There is information available in English about Apoptus if you are interested, it is made from wheat I think). There is a wonderful lady, Susan Harper (you know her) from England who is trying to help me but there are some especific questions, technical issues and… I am at a lost. Would you be please so kind as to give a hand here? But first allow me to introduce you to my wonderful lady, Ginger: Ginger is a mixed Gos dÁtura (spanish breed), sort of lab, 80 pounds, 13-years-old, spayed very young… We are not sure about her age because I took her from the shelter after having been there for 8 years. Even when the shelter staff was caring and loving, her life conditions were not the best ones, and so the food. Diagnosed with anal adenocarcinoma one month and a half ago, surgery performed with “clean” margins (meaning no cells on the edge of the tissue sample, no signs of spread or methasthasis) but not wide margins (less than 1 cm), normal calcium levels, started on chemo (mitoxantrone) three weeks ago (she has been prescribed 3 session every three weeks, next Friday 3rd June is the second one), no other health issues but severe arthritis, no external symptons no side effects of chemo but bone marrow supression treated with amoxiciline for 7 days (her blood test are back to normal now), on your suggested diet for four weeks now, taking K9, K Transfer (Susan told me is OK now), Fish/Krill Oil, Apocaps and the healthy additions to her food you recommend (she doesn´t like them but I manage). I also have modified citrus pectin and cordyceps but I was not sure about these two. So far, I have the following doubts:
    - can I use Olive oil instead/in addition to coconut oil? (I am waiting for the Coconut to arrive, I have already ordered it but I have very high quality Olive oils
    - she loves yogourt, can I use it? (she takes her dose of cottage cheese) If so, whole, light, Greek? and the calcium tablets?
    - what about fruits? Too much sugar maybe? She likes watermelon and melon and several more but banana
    - what about eggs?
    - should I give her another supplement like Modified Citrus or Cordyceps – she´s got K9 or Artemisin, ? Are the ones I am using OK for her? (I´d have started but this one)
    - should I add enzymes or as long as she eats fine and have no digestive problems it is better not to?
    - do I have to stop any supp before/after chemo with mitoxantrone? if so, how many days?
    - according to cronotherapy, what´s the best timing for mitoxantrone? I cannot find it in your book
    - can I use these supp if neutropenia happens again? And with antibiotics like amoxic.?
    - she has to start with a NSAID, Piroxicam most likely, asap. UMMMM what do you think? and what about the doses?
    If everything goes well, we´ll see if methonomic therapy is appropiate but this is another tale.
    thanks a lot for everything and sorry if I am asking very plain questions…. I am just a newcomer.
    Saludos!

  • DESIREE

    ooops sorry I forgot to mention that I also have four small Griffons (around two pounds) and that I am giving them EverPup but it seemed to me that half a scoop was too much a little so I adjusted the dosage to 1/4, Is it OK? And most important, one of them got a stone in his bladder, oxalate compound so he has to eat Hill´s non-struvite (canned food, not the dry one) but now… I am not sure if this diet is the best one I can offer him because all the things you explain in your book, what could I do? Can I use Everpup on him?
    Hope that my English is good enough to explain my vet´s and mine dubts
    Thank you again

  • DESIREE

    (I meant a little too much, not the opposite), my mistake

  • Patricia Chatov

    Hi Dr. Sue and Dr. Dressler,
    A couple of us from Tripawds were wondering about stopping at 4 rounds of chemo carboplatin. Ours are large breeds (mastiff Happy Hannah and Great Dane Atlas) and they have handled the chemo with minimal side effects. Our question is wether two more rounds of chemo or metronomics would benefit them.
    Thanks for your opinions.
    Patricia

  • Art

    Dear Dr. Dressler-

    I was wondering if you can help me try and understand something. Our almost 10 YO lab/spaniel mix was recently diagnosed as having lymphoma. Our vet, not an oncologist, made this diagnosis; we haven’t taken the dog to an oncologist to determine the type of lymphoma. There is only one oncologist around where we live, and (unfortunately) we have read several negative reviews concerning their fees. I am not 100% sure our dog has lymphoma. My question is this: If a dog is diagnosed with lymphoma, should its blood test show a high level of lymphocytes? I just rec’d a copy of his blood results, and the “LYMPHS” line shows 1.37 K/ul (Reference Range shown is 1.05-5.10; %LYMPHS is shown as 18.4%). If he had lymphoma, shouldn’t this count be higher? The only other “abnormal” readings in his test results are HCT = 33.9 % L (Reference Range 37.3-61.7); HGB = 11.6 g/dL L (Reference Range 13.1 – 20.5); AND ALKP =335 U/L H; REFERENCE RANGE 23-212. Its my understanding that an elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase could be a symptom of Cushing’s. He has lost his appetite (and weight), with taking only small bites of food (we’ve tried your Cancer Dog Diet – mixed together, he won’t eat it). We separated the ingredients in a bowl; he will only pick at whatever meat we put in the bowl (turkey, chicken, chicken liver). He also prefers eating from our hands now instead of the bowl. Drinking is normal. Our vet diagnosed lymphoma from conducting the needle test on a lymph node (all of which are swollen),with the caveat “I’m not an oncologist, but,….” How do I know its not something else (like Cushing’s Disease) or another liver ailment?

  • ZDGMcGhee

    Sienna and Sierra’s story accentuetes the crucial need for veterinary “hospitals” to truly be hospitals, not just where the pet receives excellent care with strangers. Dogs know when their family are NOT there with them, and as dear as it was for a staff member to stay with Sienna in those last hours, there has to be a better way. I would not leave a near-death or critically ill famaily member alone at a hospital, and THAT INCLUDES MY DOGS! Unthinkable, to not be there when they need you most. I hope your web connections can start a real revolutuion in providing true hospital care for animals, and keep their loved ones with them. p.s. I have a 14 yr old dog who is a testicular cancer survivor (beore I found your site), and have referred a neighbor whose dog has a rare cancer to your web site. Bet she’ll find hope, help, and encouragement for her little dog and for her own breaking heart.

  • sharon

    Dear Dr Dressler, please help.
    I have a ten year old Bulldog bitch who two weeks ago became ill, my regular vet was away and I called my second vet, he blood tested and upon examination decided that my bitch had a liver tumour, the bloods were not bad and so he gave her a injection of anabolic steroids. When my regular vet returned she came and did a full work up blood test which suggested that my dog has wide spread lymphoma. We put her on Colverson (steroid injections) 3ml twice daily and her weight is 19kg. She finds it difficult to pass faeces as I am sure that this tumour is interferring with her bowl, her upper chest and breathing is not good. She is not eating very well and her gums are still white. My question to you is there anything else that I can give her. Taking her anywhere is not an option as I would loose her before we got anywhere.
    Please help with any suggestions that you have. I am UK based. Thank you

  • Erica

    I had posted on your facebook page in response a post about apocaps and the manager of the page suggested I comment here as well – I would love love love it if there was a forumla like the apocaps for kittys! I had asked Dr Sue a while back about my kitty Jill taking them (she has osteosarcoma) and she mentioned they are not safe for kitties (I believe they have an NSAID effect on them?). All my friends on tripawds.com give the apocaps to their pups and rave about them – it sure does seem to work very well! and when is the KITTY cancer survival guide going to come out :D

  • Robin

    Can apocaps be used for a dog who does not have cancer, in order to prevent cancer from developing?

    Thanks!

    • Susan Kazara Harper

      Hi Robin, Thanks for asking. Apocaps are designed specifically for dogs who have cancer and it’s not appropriate to use on healthy dogs as a preventative. BUT, Dr. Dressler was asked this very question so often that he developed EVERPUP. EverPup is a wonderful, “ultimate” dog supplement with some of the ingredients of Apocaps at lower amounts and a different formulation, plus loads more. It’s 100% natural, high-grade ingredients also help with our dog’s skin and coat, joints, organ health, digestion, and everything else. If you go to http://www.everpup.com you can learn all about it. So many dogs love EverPup, that there is a 100% bottom-of-the-jar guarantee. I know your dog will love it.

  • Sheila

    Just viewed the video of dogs singing for pet cancer awareness. My greyhound Lucy was diagnosed with osteosarcoma on October 2011. After ampuation and chemotherapy she is still doing great. I was disappointed that the video did not have any tripaw survivors.

  • Susan Kazara Harper

    Hi Phyllis, Yes, you can use the spot-on type flea and tick treatments for your dog. They are safer than other, generalized types. I hope this helps. All the best, Susan

    • Phyllis

      I keep running across items about spot-ons causing so it scared me. Does Dr Dressler think they are safe too?

      • Susan Kazara Harper

        Hi Phyllis, Of course you want to be cautious. Yes, Dr. Dressler recommends the spot-on treatments as the safer option. Any chemical carries it’s own risks and you will find ‘horror stories’ about even the spot-on treatments. They are designed, after all, to kill-off, and precent those annoying fleas and ticks. You have to balance the safest possible treatment with the problems if your dog becomes infested/infected with fleas or ticks. If your dog is likely to be exposed to either, the cautious use of a spot-on treatment is appropriate.

  • Susan Kazara Harper

    Hi Phyllis, The important balance is to determine whether the danger of the flea infestation is greater than any potential toxic effect from a treatment. Even Revolution (and Stronghold) contains the warning “Not for human use. Keep out of reach of children”. Our dogs with cancer have compromised immune systems, we want the least exposure possible to anything toxic. Keep an eye out for our upcoming blog on effective and safe(r) flea and tick treatments.

  • Phyllis

    I understand that now. I researched these and Revolution actually enters the blood system which the others don’t. So it’s 6 of one & a half dozen of the other.
    I am thinking of sticking with Frontline but look forward to more information from you folks. What a predicament our babies are in.

  • Dr. Demian Dressler

    Dear Martha,
    No real data on the diet per se. BUT-
    flax has some merits:
    http://www.dogcancerblog.com/cancer-spread-flax-and-dog-cancer/
    but you need a LOT to have an impact as you can see from the post.
    Cottage cheese has CLA:
    http://www.dogcancerblog.com/conjugated-linoleic-acid-and-dog-cancer/
    So there’s some nice stuff, but again, dose in cottage cheese is kind of low compared to what you want.
    Bottom line: dog cancer diet (free download on top of blog) has more merit. You want to give flax and cottage cheese or add them to the ration? OK!
    Hope this helps
    D